Sigur Rós – “Fjögur Píanó” Video (Feat. Shia LaBeouf) (NSFW)

Shia LaBeouf’s dong is probably not the first thing you’d expect to see in a Sigur Rós video, but it is indeed one of the first things that appears onscreen in the new video for the meditative instrumental piece “Fjögur Píanó.” In the clip, we see LaBeouf engaging in some morning naked experimental ballet with a limber blonde ladyfriend, going on an underwater car ride, crying at the sight of a room full of wall-mounted butterflies, and committing some sort of bloody sex assault. It doesn’t make the tiniest bit of sense, but it’s fascinating regardless. The video, from director “Alma Har’el, is part of the band’s “Mystery Film Experiment series,” which has already given us videos for the Valtari songs “Ég Anda” and “Varúð.” Watch the incredibly strange new one below.

Valtari is out now on XL.

Comments (53)
  1. Here’s my homemade SFW edit. I admit I took some creative liberties.

  2. My compulsive habit of pressing ‘Command-F–Shia LeBeouf’s dong’ on every webpage i stumble upon has finally paid off.

  3. What. The. Hell. Did I just watch?

    • Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

      • “I actively seek out things that annoy me”–you

        • Haha on the contrary, I love Bjork and Sigur Ros, especially the visual aspects of their art. As I mentioned in passing below, my above statement wasn’t intended to be taken at surface value as I knew it would be. The first part is supposed to be an entendre of sorts (albeit a pretty loose and bad one) and the second part was meant as a compliment. I totally understand the confusion, though, and I apologize if anyone was actually offended.

          • “I post things knowing they will be misunderstood in their present form and yet do not revise them.”

          • I have aspirations to be the next Ridley Scott. If you’re confused, don’t worry, I am too. Just trust me when I say that everything will make sense in a few years, i.e. the Director’s Cut.

    • Monach Programming…look it up!

      • You said this twice, so I did look it up. It has nothing to do with the images presented in the video so far as I can tell, so I’m hoping maybe you could further explain this great mystery that you think you’ve solved. And I mean that genuinely. I don’t actually get what the connection is that you seem to be making.

        Also, there are no Monarchs in this video. lol

  4. This new Magic Mike trailer is weird.

  5. I think I saw a preview for that….

  6. I’m pretty sure that’s Shia LaBeouf’s favorite music video of all time.

  7. I think it’s sad that we live in a world where a post containing a glimpse of Shia LaBeouf’s penis is tagged NSFW but a picture of Billy Corgan that sits all week in the Most Commented section contains no such warning.

  8. guess I can mark seeing a Even Stevens cast member wang off my bucket list, thanks Shia!

  9. Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

  10. I don’t know, I think I liked it. Weird as fuck. But what I got out of it was something like; they’re in an abusive, or at least co-dependent relationship, one that is possibly being affected by outside forces. After everything has broken and they’ve cleaned up the pieces, they have nothing left.

    I know I’m probably reaching, but by the end of it I was actually a bit sad. Which, I think, is probably what they intended.

    • That is a good interpretation, and I would go as far to say that the video is extremely sad or uplifting depending upon one’s interpretation.

      I see a strained relationship where a woman is trying her damnedest to get through to the man she loves despite the fact that he seems to have fallen into a black hole and is still descending. I can definitely see the co-dependent angle. With respect to the scene where she is trying to get through to him, though, I would say that it might be a more one-sided relationship and she is desperate to save him. He seems to show flashes of his old self (the ballerina scene) so, she believes that there is still a way to reach him.

      Where the two interpretations diverge, in my opinion, is how the viewer decides to order the events in the video. The extremely sad route might be accepting the events chronologically and realizing that the characters are stuck in a vicious cycle of co-dependence, as you said. Following this route, the marks on the woman’s back might be one for each time she unsuccessfully tried to get through to the guy. Even though the man is “awake” and saddened once he sees the abuse he has put his lover through, the mirroring of the ballet across timelines may reveal that he will slowly relapse back to his old ways.

      However, if you take the events out of order, you could make an argument for the beginning being the point where the cycle of abuse is broken and the woman has finally gotten through to the man. You noticed the fact that they have nothing left…but you forgot that the still have each other (cliche, baby but true) and maybe this is what it takes to wake the man up (the realization at the destruction of something he cherishes (the butterflies, which maybe represent the woman?)). Then the rest of the video would be a look at how the characters arrived at this point of rebirth. The fact that they put on each others’ clothing could be interpreted as a very significant event and the end of the timeline we see would be the last shot of them holding each other before the men enter with the drugs.

      I am not sure how I feel about the roles of the other two male characters. They could be negative external forces as you said, or they could be guides for those who have fallen in that black hole I spoke of earlier. They somewhat remind me of the role of a certain actor in Shutter Island (if you have read the book or seen the movie, you know who I am talking about).

      I think that a vicious cycle is on display with hints of rock bottom. After LaBeouf punches the mirror, the woman disappears for a bit causing him to take his rage out on the room. There is a shot of a unicorn statue breaking in the water which both may hint at her eventually leaving him (possibly by suicide). The scene of each of the statues being underwater and being destroyed might be the most symbolic bit in the piece with regards to the future of these characters.

      You may have been referring to my earlier comment as one of the snarky/mean comments, but I can assure you that it wasn’t intended the way I knew it would be taken (evidenced by the downvotes) at surface value. It was supposed to be an all encompassing mock critique and knowing wink but it might have gone over a few heads (like the video). I probably broke the record for the the first quint-dectuple entendre.

      In all seriousness, this video will definitely stay with me throughout the year. I was blown away by the beauty and fragility of the principles. People will be quick to call LaBeouf and the whole production pretentious, but I just think that it is pretty damn good art with a lot of interpretations. Our interpretations could be far off. It would be cool to get a few pieces to the puzzle from the director and screenwriter, but it would also be cool if they refused to give easy answers and left it completely open to subject opinion.

      Sorry for that drawn out interpretation/review, but your second comment got to me in a good way.

      • Nice. Very good thoughts/ideas all the way around.

        I’ve watched it two more times and I definitely think it’s about a cycle of violent (symbolic or otherwise) co-dependency, a want/need for change and the failure of achieving it within their relationship. The bruises on the women’s thighs at the beginning, the male and female characters wearing each others clothes, the use of the butterfly – being a symbol for cyclical change/rebirth, her pushing the framed picture of the butterfly in his face because she wants him to change, him smashing said frame which causes her to disappear for the moment and him putting another mark in her back at the end just before they’re left, A) with nothing (besides each other, which may lead to), or B) starting the cycle over again.

        I definitely agree with you that the events are either purposely out of order or are meant to be interpreted as multiple recurrences of the same events (nice catch of the dance being done identically at different times). Either way, it does little to change the way I’m seeing the end result.

        The scenes outside of the room with the “Forces” (as they are actually billed in the credits) and the statues falling through the water are definitely the most unclear in my mind. And they’re definitely tied together, too, as we see all four characters both acting in front of screen filled with water, and driving in the car “under water”. Also, I get the blindfolds on the male and female characters – that could be interpreted any number of ways in relation to everything else we’ve discussed. But I don’t get the red and blue light up lollipop/sucker things at all. I mean, really reaching I could see them representing some sort of electric, emotional charge kind of thing… but yeah, that’s really reaching.

        I guess some people will label it as pretentious. But only if they’re not trying very hard to see ANYTHING in the images being presented to the viewer. There is clearly something going on there – it’s not as if it’s just a bunch of random shots that have no deeper meaning (something that I think Sigur Ros’ video for Gobbledygook, as much as I dug it, could be guilty of). I also applaud the actors for really giving it a go. Once you’re nude, you’re nude forever in the age of the internet, so it’s nice to see that at least those images are worth discussing for something beyond titillation. I’m pretty sure Shia actually punched both the framed butterfly and the mirror pretty damn hard, too. Those knuckle cuts did not look happy. For a video with no dialogue, the intended emotional impact is very clear. Whether or not it it works for everyone is a personal matter. Art is subjective and all that blah, blah, blah.

        • I knew I should have stayed for the credits (in regards to the mentioning of the “forces”), but I get impatient if I’m not in the theater.

          Yeah, this might be Shia’s best acting effort yet (besides Even Stevens haha). It does appear that he gets hurt after punching the mirror (destruction of one’s image could be another significant step towards rebirth, even though he marks the girl afterwards), and you can kind of see in one of his reaction shots that it hurts like hell. It sort of just dawned on me that this whole scene might have been an allusion to Captain Willard (Martin Sheen) from Apocalypse Now. That might have be one of many clues from the director/screenwriter. It would be cool to see a list of references or nods to other art.

          (A stab at the “forces”‘) They definitely seem to control and influence all aspects of the couple’s life (polar moments from pleasure to pain). Every negative and positive moment is influenced by an action of the “forces.” So, I guess the “forces” are ultimately controlling them. It is important to show them taking away the pictures to suggest their power and influence over the couple. Shoot, one interpretation could be that the couple are just subjects under study by the “forces.”

          • Mmm. See, I don’t think it’s the last part, the “being watched” aspect.

            After having watched it three times it’s never completely clear if they’re supposed to be seen as “outside” forces, or “internal” forces. I don’t necessarily think it’s about the Forces “controlling” them so much as “guiding” and influencing them. At least not controlling them in a third party sort of way. I think they may be “first person” Forces, so to speak.

            They are in the front seat of the car, “driving” the blindfolded male/female. So in that sense it would appear that they do represent a certain amount of letting go on the part of the male/female. Maybe something to do with a repeated attempt at trust during one or more parts of the “cycle”. But then one of the Forces goes and smashes a bottle over the head of the other one (a breaking of their trust?). I think they may be more about the male/females own subconscious, id and ego. …. yeah, that might work.

          • Also, the cigarette butts and the forces blowing “smoke”…

            One, that many butts would point towards a great deal of time passing.

            Two, a literal “cancer” within the relationship.

          • Sorry, more like a metaphorical or figurative cancer… but, yeah, a “cancer” in the relationship.

        • red and blue lollipops are clearly drugs (notice their actions when they first get them, also notice the scorpion inside of them). also, notice their “trip” after taking them

      • Monarch Program, look it up and you might see the truth!

        • I’m pretty sure this video is about two opposing teams of english-speaking robots from space that transform into various automobiles.

  11. Oh… sorry. I see now that every other comment is sarcastic, snarky or mean. My bad.

    • Hey, if you found it moving, more power to ya. You can only be a better person for critically engaging things. Myself? I prefer Even Stevens gifs.

      • Well, shit, it’s pretty clear you’re going to make the “Shut Up Dude!” charts while I continue to toil in middle of the road Up Vote mediocrity. So maybe you’ve got the right idea after all!

      • Haha in my opinion (which y’all might be tired of by the time you read this), your User’s Cut of the video sets the bar pretty high for comment of the week; may there be many more upvotes!

  12. I’m worried about Shia Labeouf, you guys.

  13. I’ve always wanted to see Shia in the Beouf.

  14. you know, I’m not gonna watch this. I don’t want my childhood to be ruined. I watched Even Stevens as a kid, and I enjoyed that show. I’m not gonna ruin that.

  15. I wonder if Shia still supports Cardboard City (a seemingly defunct collective of El-P, Darryl Palumbo, F. Sean Martin, etc.) Actually, I’m not really wondering this, I just wanted to post this pic and show everyone how cool i am because i knew about this CC shit before everyone was all over EL-P’s jock. winksies

  16. Yeah, like I haven’t seen that before.

  17. I thought it was good. I really enjoyed the insightful comments as well, but not so much the rude ones. I love Sigur Ros, I love anything experimental. However, it DID weird me out a little that it was Shia Labeouf, though I do admit he actually was really good.

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