The Antlers - Familiars

Brooklyn trio the Antlers have built a career from crafting slow, graceful swells of indie rock, and they’ve only moved further toward thoughtful grandeur since they came onto the map with Hospice five years ago. Familiars, the band’s new album, is frontman Peter Silberman reflecting on the death of a friend. The band produced the album themselves, and Chris Coady, the veteran indie producer who’s helped to make recent Beach House and Future Islands records sound so great, mixed it. We’ve posted the early tracks “Palace” and “Hotels,” and now the entire album is streaming at NPR.

Familiars is out 6/17 on Anti-.

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Comments (7)
  1. This is huge. Maybe their best album yet (to these ears, anyway).

  2. Caught on to this one a few weeks ago when it leaked.

    My first listen or two came on my crappy work computer speakers, and I felt the whole thing was a little monochromatic and boring, and that there was too much trumpet.

    But when I finally got in a headphone listen it changed everything and having heard it that way and going back to the crappy speakers it retains it’s charm.

    Fact is, it IS really of-a-sound and pared back, but as much as the bombastic moments of Hospice and Burst Apart were exciting and “Epic”, it’s really refreshing to have this album whose theme is disconnect between mind, soul and body, and have it delivered in such a plaintive, searching way.

    I love pretty much everything about this album; I love the notably unadorned instrumentation; I love Peter Silberman working more in his lower register; I love the questions the lyrics ask about the immortality of love and memory. I think this is a quiet and beautiful work that’s probably better than Burst Apart and nearly at the level of Hospice.

    Well done.

  3. HORNS HORNS HORNS.

  4. had the pleasure of streaming this last night during my graveyard shift and it was probably the most fitting late night thinking music I could ask for

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