Few artists could sustain the sort of rarity scrounging posthumous repackaging treatment Jeff gets — but naturally we’ve bought just about every boxed set/live show/remastered demo release mom Mary Guibert’s put together (and then some she hasn’t). But the tenth anniversary of Jeff’s death approaches, a natural time for reflection on his tragically brief recording career — and a natural time for another retrospective release. Naturally.

So on 5/22, one week prior to the 10th anniversary of Buckley’s passing, Legacy will release Songs From Jeff Buckley, which liner note author David Fricke calls “the closest Jeff Buckley — singer, songwriter, guitarist, seeker — ever comes to having his own greatest-hits record.”

The real bait for Buckley completists, though, is a who-knows-how-rare cover of the Smiths’ “I Know It’s Over,” recorded for a radio program in April of ’95 but edited out before broadcast. Fricke says it captures Jeff “spacewalking with elegance through the harrowing resignation of ’I Know It’s Over,’” with which we shan’t argue.

Jeff Buckley – “I Know It’s Over” (QT | Real | WMA)

Songs From Jeff Buckley is out 5/22 on Legacy.

Comments (46)
  1. gary  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 0

    meh. it’s okay. it really just makes me appreciate the original more.

  2. Is it just me or does Jeff Buckley REALLY not have a voice? He could make Ryan Cabrera sound good.

    http://homemademusicvideos.blogspot.com

  3. adam  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 0

    sounds like a cross between hallelujah and the drugs don’t work. so there’s that…

  4. nick  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 -1

    ok. so this good looking dude died young.

    can we please move on??

  5. Kevin  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 +1

    I’m sorry, but saying dumb things is not going to get me to visit your website. Buckley was alleged to have a 4 octave range, which by default gives you one hell of a voice.

  6. ec  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 0

    i swear, it seems like half of the songs jeff ever sung include some reference to the sea or water.

  7. “I’m sorry, but saying dumb things is not going to get me to visit your website. Buckley was alleged to have a 4 octave range, which by default gives you one hell of a voice.”

    >>Great, but he certainly didn’t utilize it in this song. I’d love to hear something else if you feel like recommending something.

  8. frankie  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 +1

    anyone who can’t appreciate jeff buckley is just a twat.

    you’re just a twat.

  9. For anyone still interested, I’m fairly sure there’s a Hallelujah/I Know its over medley out there. Try the Hype Machine.

    Stereogum commenters: please be constructive. I really like this site, but sometimes I wonder what kind of readership I’m associating myself with.

  10. porj  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 +1

    saying jeff buckley didn’t have a voice is like saying dolly parton is flat chested.
    nigga please.

  11. liv  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 0

    Rochelle Nikita just admitted to not knowing much else, if any, of Jeff Buckley’s songs, so it’s his/her loss.

    Jeff’s music is so personal and beautiful that I don’t need any blog commenter to tell me if it is good or bad.

  12. Janitor Swirls  |   Posted on May 2nd, 2007 0

    jeff buckley doesn’t have a voice?

    do you even like radiohead?

  13. i’m a bit more partial to the hallelujah/ i know it’s over medley myself.

  14. matt b  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    this post was intended for the longtime buckley fans, not those who are hearing him for the first time. why would you judge the man by a radio cut he did in 95? a cover no less, c’mon.

  15. tyler  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    I was gonna comment but Janitor Swirls took the words out of my mouth. he/she really hit the nail on the head! (pun intended!!)

  16. drew  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 +1

    he does a pretty impressive version of “the boy with the thorn in his side” too.

  17. Neilo  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    I still haven’t listened to the second disc from Sketches for My Sweetheart… yet. I’ve owned it for 6 years (I think) and I still think the man had a good voice, crap songwriting skills (cf, Grace, Mystery White Boy, Sketches for My Sweetheart – all loaded with duff lyrics), and was mellifluous of guitar. I just don’t get why he was/is venerated to such an extent. Can someone please tell me why I don’t like Jeff Buckley in the slightest? (Disparaging remarks will be ignored)

  18. The best cover Jeff ever did was of ‘The way young lovers do’ in my opinion. Infact, I’m going to go and listen to that right now. Amazing song.

  19. Oh, just thought I’d add that there’s a version of the cover in a German bootleg (24-02-95), and it’s currently up on dimeadozen.

  20. BLS  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    He has a voice, but he just murders the song. Somehow, he drains the vast majority of the emotion from it. The start’s alright, but whenever he shifts he overdoes it quite a bit and ends up just sounding flat and strained. Shame, too. I like the original quite a bit.

  21. Evan  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    Everyone has to hear “Gunshot Glitter” by Buckley. IT was a bonus track on the european release of sketches and it fucking blows the rest of it out of the water.

  22. Evan  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    And to Rochelle…if you are going to post a link to your music blog along with every comment and want to attract people to it, you should probably:

    a. recognize who Cat Stevens is and that he is not Matisyahu, and

    b. certainly have heard at least some of Jeff Buckleys music.

  23. “a. recognize who Cat Stevens is and that he is not Matisyahu…”

    Please tell me this didn’t really happen. Anyway, Rochelle if you want to check out Jeff Buckley for a better first impression try the “Grace” album.

  24. seth  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    My favourite Jeff Buckley cover song is probably his version of Dylan’s ‘Just Like A Woman’.

  25. HELLO? I KNOW Cat Stevens is not that other dude. That’s what I said – apparently somebody misconstrued it, although I don’t know how. And thank you, Adam, for the recommendation.

  26. AHEM, I specifically said Cat Stevens was NOT that Matisyahu dude… Yusaf Islam, or whatever, was the name he changed to. SO I don’t know who misconstrued that.

    Anyway, thank you, Adam, for the recommendation. I checked out some of his stuff that fans had uploaded to YouTube, and I like it a lot better. He’s much more talented than my first impression led me to believe.

  27. karl  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    Jeff Buckley was a beautiful man with a beautiful voice. That being said, this is old news. I heard this cover years ago. He really excells at covers as some here have said already.

  28. I still thing his version of “Kangaroo” (or “Kanga Roo,” if you prefer) is quite lovely.

  29. Tony G  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    It sure is fun to see all the grumpy Jeff Buckley defenders come out in full fascist force to defend yet another shitty cover that’s been unearthed.

  30. It sure is fun to see all the Jeff Buckley detractors come out in full fascist force to deride yet another great cover that’s been unearthed.

  31. Anything Jeff does is going to be good. Better than good, actually– it’s going to be fucking amazing.

    Part of the problem with unearthing covers like this is that they ARE going to appeal mostly to people who’ve been a longstanding fan of Jeff’s music and who understand his output– because as a whole, this fits in directly with how passionate he was. I don’t think this cover is devoid of emotion at all. I feel like it’s just dripping with it, actually. It’d be kind of impossible to find anything that he did that lacks emotion.

    I second the person who brought up “The Boy With The Thorn In His Side”…one of my favourite covers he’s ever done, I only wish I found a better quality version of it.

  32. Tony G  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    It’s too bad Jeff Buckley couldn’t swim. Perhaps he could have fronted The New Smiths if he were around today.

    At the record company meeting,
    On their hands a devious, truculent, and unreliable lead singer,
    And oh, the plans they weave,
    And oh, the sickening greed

    Re-record ! Re-package ! Re-package !
    Re-evaluate the songs
    Double-pack with a photograph
    Extra Track (and a tacky badge)

    A-list, playlist
    “Please them , please them !”
    “Please them !”
    (sadly, THIS was your life)

    But you could have said no
    If you’d wanted to
    You could have said no
    If you’d wanted to

    BPI, MTV, BBC
    “Please them ! Please them !”
    (sadly this would have been Jeff Buckley’s life)

  33. Evan  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    Actually Rochelle, (and I quote, from two posts earlier):

    “yes, that’s the rapper, not Cat Stevens.”

    so yes, you did say that. and you’re an idiot. and your blog is absolutely terrible. its like a shitty mix up of bad stereogum and a 15 year old girls diary.

  34. David Layne  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    Jeff Buckley was one of the most amazing singers who ever lived,period.I’ve been a singer/writer/keyboardist for 35 years,and very few artists impress me as much as Jeff did/does.If you don’t appreciate this,you probably think FallOutBoy are musical geniuses,and if you do,God help you.There is no one alive today who sounds like Jeff.Even though some of the live stuff that comes out may not be perfect,it’s so far closer to perfect than anything being released today there is simply no comparison.

  35. jim  |   Posted on May 3rd, 2007 0

    nealo, you had to be there.
    Here’s the difference: in the mid-90′s, so many bands defined themselves but what they ‘weren’t.’
    To me, a lot of times, the whole alternative scene just felt lazy. Bands who couldn’t really sing, couldn’t really play and REALLY couldn’t dress. and thought it was funny to play classic rock covers while drunk. i guess it was fun for them? along comes Buckley. Not part of any scene, really. Singing in this angelic voice, with this band that roars like Led Zeppelin (way before that was post-modernly cool), and doing covers by Nina Simone (way before the Starbucks generation picked up on that artist), is funny as hell, and looks he’s going to steal your girlfriend. dude re-invented the game. i agree the records don’t totally hold up or maybe, show you the whole thing. but, live, trust me, there was nothing even close.

  36. Evan:

    Look on the CAT STEVENS post: I corrected myself already, without help. And if you think my blog is so crappy, just don’t go. I just got an IM from a guy on YouTube who told me he loved it.

  37. mrs  |   Posted on May 4th, 2007 0

    Honestly, I never thought I’d see the day where people would piss all over Buckley’s work. I mean, there are few things in life that are static — death, taxes, and the fact that Jeff Buckley is one of the greatest musical artists that ever existed. And if you don’t believe some random people on a blog, listen to the critics, listen to musicians, both the insanely popular and wealthy to the ones never heard — there are very few people who could possibly find a negative thing to say about him, and it’s not simply because he died at a young age. It’s because he was truly, genuinely gifted, in voice, and in spirit. That’s just a fact. If it makes you feel better to trash him without actually doing your research, have at it. It speaks far more of your comprehension than it does of his abilities.

  38. Nicole  |   Posted on May 5th, 2007 0

    Jeff Buckley could swim. He was pulled in by an undertow. It’s like trying to fight a rip current except worse.

    Anywho, Jeff Buckley’s music, in my opinion, exudes a very sincere sense of passion. There just aren’t many mainstream artists and bands out there today that I get that vibe from.

  39. Steve  |   Posted on May 9th, 2007 0

    The person that said “Ya, so he was a good looking dude, can we move on?” is an ignorant fool. If you knew anything about Jeff you would know that he was the real deal. He was incredible and all about the music. He hated the fact that people drew attention to his good looks.

    And for the person that said half of his songs reference rivers is a complete twit as well. The only songs that reference water are, ‘Nightmares by the Sea, ‘So Real’, ‘Dream Brother’ and, ‘You & I.’

    Look at Morrissey. How many of his songs are about death or extremely depressing topics? Basically everything he wrote is depressing. Not to take anything away from him. He’s still one of a kind, as Jeff was.

    For the person who said he had crap song writing skills…What do you need to impress you? How is Grace filled with duff lyrics? Listen to Mojo Pin. “Precious, precious silver and gold and pearls in oysters flesh. Drop down we two to serve and pray to love.” That sounds pretty damn poetic to me. And listen to Everybody Here Wants You from Sketches. “29 pearls in your kiss, a singing smile, coffee smell and lilac skin, your flame in me.” How is that bland? You just need to really listen. Jeff takes getting used to as he was very unorthodox. If you want to hear his voice at it’s best and his guitar playing unlike anything you’ve ever heard, listen to his live cd “Live at Sin-é (Legacy Edition).” His cover of Van Morrison’s, ‘The Way Young Lovers Do’ will clearly show you how remarkable a musician he was. His guitar playing was just as good as his voice, if not better. Grace wasn’t about him showing his guitar chops. Jeff could play any style of music and you’d think it was his specialty. He was more about creating atmosphere with the guitar, rather than blowing people away with volume and guitar solos.

  40. Manuel Morillo  |   Posted on Jul 9th, 2007 0

    The only time I went out and bought extra copies of an album and gave it to my friends was after listening to “Grace” by Jeff Buckley. I felt like if I didn’t share this with them it would be as though I was commiting a crime.

  41. Andy  |   Posted on Sep 10th, 2007 0

    No reference to the content of the song, for a late singer? I know there are other death-related songs, but this really floored me.

    Whether or not it’s a good cover, and to me it’s excellent and then some, it is eery, no? It must’ve been hard for his mom to listen to, but perhaps therapeutic.

    Then he finished with a thank you!

  42. Jordan  |   Posted on Nov 25th, 2007 0

    Not nearly as haunting as the original Smiths version: Morrissey’s vocals bring me close to tears whenever I hear it; Buckley’s vocals are a little, well, prosaic – I was, sadly, unmoved and in no way did he convey the sheer desperation and hopelessness Morrisey does.

  43. Wow, I’m always amazed by how heated conversations about music get!!
    well i think it’s important to realize that there is so much music out there and people are entitled to their own opinions, you’re bound to listen to something and love it and you are also bound to find other stuff awful! it doesn’t mean that you are right and i’m wrong and vice versa, just a difference in opinions. therefore people shouldn’t be making massive statements about how bad someone’s music or talent is because there will always be someone to combat that argument, and you will always offend someone.

    music is music, it just is, whether it be pop, rock, rnb, alternative, it shouldn’t be judged, it should be enjoyed, it shouldn’t be put on a pedastool or dissed, it should just be :)

    having said that, I am a huge Jeff Buckley fan, i think he is insanely talented (and that’s just me) perhaps his music doesn’t appeal to everyone, and that is only natural, we are after all different people with different tastes, but i do find it insulting that his talents, or his abilities should be put under scrutiny, because maybe if i don’t know something about music, i’m sure these people do :

    Gary Lucas (gods and monsters)
    “his voice sounded like an angel, or like a gift from God.”

    Elizabeth Fraser (Cocteau Twins)
    “”I’d love to sing with Jeff Buckley – Tim Buckley’s son. He is currently making his first album, and if it’s anything like a radio session I heard by him, it should be amazing. He’s written this song called ‘Grace’, which literally makes the hair on my neck stand on end. I was sweating like a fucking June bride when I first heard him. Music has never done that to me before.”

    Rufus Wainwright:
    “I was so jealous of his ability, and especially his voice, which I’m still a little jealous of.”

    Andy Wallace
    “He (Jeff) had the sonic equivalent of a photographic memory. He could also do a pretty credible rendition of things he hated.”

    Elvis Costello
    ?I hope that people who liked him resist the temptation to turn his life and death into some dumb romantic fantasy–he was so much better than that. Not everyone can get up and sing something they take a liking to and make it their own, sing true to their heart and be curious about all different strains of music. ”

    Elton John:
    “?One of the greatest albums–definitely in the top 10 of all time–is Grace by Jeff Buckley, and it didn’t really sell much. It’s the most perfect album–kind of like a dream, as if it came from someone from another planet possessing this incredible voice, power and soul. And yet it wasn’t a commercial success?

    Chris Cornell (sound garden, audioslave):
    ?He’s one of those talents where it makes you really look at yourself and go, `What’s going on here? This guy has been touched by an angel’…you feel like a kindergartner when you listen to him.?

    Jimmy Paige (led Zepplin):
    ?Technically he was the best singer that appeared, that had appeared probably, I?m not being too liberal about this if I say in two decades. I started to play grace constantly and the more I listened to the album the more I heard, the more I appreciated of Jeff and Jeff?s talents and Jeff?s total ability to which he was just a wizard and it was close to being my favorite album of the decade.?

    Joan Osbourne
    “There was a period when I couldn’t get through the day without hearing him sing ‘Hallelujah’ 3 or 4 times. He had a one in a billion voice and an emotionally piercing guitar style ”

    Bono (U2):
    “Jeff buckley?s voice reminds me of the first line of the old salvation army hymn ?amazing grace how sweet the sound? grace as a signature. Grace personified in one man?s vibrato- a delicate tremulous voice which rightfully betrays it?s middle eastern tutelage. Jeff was trained in sufi singing. His ululating voice reminds me how few singers there are in rock and roll.?

    Bernard Butler (suede):
    “Yes, he had a fantastic voice and he was very sexy, but he was a fantastic guitar player as well, which no-one ever mentions. ”

    Tori Amos:

    ” (on grace) I was hearing this and…to know that he was able to tap into this, and yet wasn’t able to stay on the planet for whatever reason. But he could touch this level of grace.”

    Ben Harper:
    “Never have I seen such infinite musical potential in anyone.

    John Legend:
    ” …one of the greatest singers I’ve ever heard. You feel he had no limitations on his voice …”

    that’s just a few, needless to say, radiohead, coldplay, travis, starsailor, mandy moore, justin timberlake.

    I don’t think i should argue his talent anymore, whether it appeals to you or not is completely up to you!

    I will leave you with a quote from the man himself.

    “All I can do is to write songs and whether people want to hear them is up to them and not to me. I realize that, I do not think I can save the world. I look at the world and conclude it does not want to be saved. People want to be controlled. At my concerts you can do whatever you want to. You don’t have to listen, you can have a beer if you’re fed up (with the concert). I do not have the intention to be crucified.”-Jeff Buckley

  44. Wow, I’m always amazed by how heated conversations about music get!!
    well i think it’s important to realize that there is so much music out there and people are entitled to their own opinions, you’re bound to listen to something and love it and you are also bound to find other stuff awful! it doesn’t mean that you are right and i’m wrong and vice versa, just a difference in opinions. therefore people shouldn’t be making massive statements about how bad someone’s music or talent is because there will always be someone to combat that argument, and you will always offend someone.

    music is music, it just is, whether it be pop, rock, rnb, alternative, it shouldn’t be judged, it should be enjoyed, it shouldn’t be put on a pedastool or dissed, it should just be :)

    having said that, I am a huge Jeff Buckley fan, i think he is insanely talented (and that’s just me) perhaps his music doesn’t appeal to everyone, and that is only natural, we are after all different people with different tastes, but i do find it insulting that his talents, or his abilities should be put under scrutiny, because maybe if i don’t know something about music, i’m sure these people do :

    Gary Lucas (gods and monsters)
    “his voice sounded like an angel, or like a gift from God.”

    Elizabeth Fraser (Cocteau Twins)
    “”I’d love to sing with Jeff Buckley – Tim Buckley’s son. He is currently making his first album, and if it’s anything like a radio session I heard by him, it should be amazing. He’s written this song called ‘Grace’, which literally makes the hair on my neck stand on end. I was sweating like a fucking June bride when I first heard him. Music has never done that to me before.”

    Rufus Wainwright:
    “I was so jealous of his ability, and especially his voice, which I’m still a little jealous of.”

    Andy Wallace
    “He (Jeff) had the sonic equivalent of a photographic memory. He could also do a pretty credible rendition of things he hated.”

    Elvis Costello
    ?I hope that people who liked him resist the temptation to turn his life and death into some dumb romantic fantasy–he was so much better than that. Not everyone can get up and sing something they take a liking to and make it their own, sing true to their heart and be curious about all different strains of music. ”

    Elton John:
    “?One of the greatest albums–definitely in the top 10 of all time–is Grace by Jeff Buckley, and it didn’t really sell much. It’s the most perfect album–kind of like a dream, as if it came from someone from another planet possessing this incredible voice, power and soul. And yet it wasn’t a commercial success?

    Chris Cornell (sound garden, audioslave):
    ?He’s one of those talents where it makes you really look at yourself and go, `What’s going on here? This guy has been touched by an angel’…you feel like a kindergartner when you listen to him.?

    Jimmy Paige (led Zepplin):
    ?Technically he was the best singer that appeared, that had appeared probably, I?m not being too liberal about this if I say in two decades. I started to play grace constantly and the more I listened to the album the more I heard, the more I appreciated of Jeff and Jeff?s talents and Jeff?s total ability to which he was just a wizard and it was close to being my favorite album of the decade.?

    Joan Osbourne
    “There was a period when I couldn’t get through the day without hearing him sing ‘Hallelujah’ 3 or 4 times. He had a one in a billion voice and an emotionally piercing guitar style ”

    Bono (U2):
    “Jeff buckley?s voice reminds me of the first line of the old salvation army hymn ?amazing grace how sweet the sound? grace as a signature. Grace personified in one man?s vibrato- a delicate tremulous voice which rightfully betrays it?s middle eastern tutelage. Jeff was trained in sufi singing. His ululating voice reminds me how few singers there are in rock and roll.?

    Bernard Butler (suede):
    “Yes, he had a fantastic voice and he was very sexy, but he was a fantastic guitar player as well, which no-one ever mentions. ”

    Tori Amos:

    ” (on grace) I was hearing this and…to know that he was able to tap into this, and yet wasn’t able to stay on the planet for whatever reason. But he could touch this level of grace.”

    Ben Harper:
    “Never have I seen such infinite musical potential in anyone.

    John Legend:
    ” …one of the greatest singers I’ve ever heard. You feel he had no limitations on his voice …”

    that’s just a few, needless to say, radiohead, coldplay, travis, starsailor, mandy moore, justin timberlake.

    I don’t think i should argue his talent anymore, whether it appeals to you or not is completely up to you!

    I will leave you with a quote from the man himself.

    “All I can do is to write songs and whether people want to hear them is up to them and not to me. I realize that, I do not think I can save the world. I look at the world and conclude it does not want to be saved. People want to be controlled. At my concerts you can do whatever you want to. You don’t have to listen, you can have a beer if you’re fed up (with the concert). I do not have the intention to be crucified.”-Jeff Buckley

  45. Insipid  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2010 0

    History lesson for you: it is NOT fascist to merely have a strong oppinion fascists weren’t fascists for their strong oppinions, they were fascists because they backed up their oppinons with brute force. Until a Buckley fan starts threatening to take you to the woods and shoot you, can it with the “fascist” talk. Unless if you like looking stupid.

    . I just listened to the Smiths version on Youtube, i actually liked Jeffs version better. But, i’m biased. What i’m NOT is immature enough to start bashing the Smiths just to try and get a rise out of you.

    It’s one thing to simply state that his music doesn’t do it for you. That’s all fine and well, but when you come out and use purposely inflamatory and somewhat hostile language like “shitty cover” it’s disengenuous, passive aggressive, and sophmoric to then lable the response that you provoked :”fascist,”

    You want a more tolerant tone to different views, HAVE a more tolerant tone to different views.

  46. Julia   |   Posted on Jan 24th, 2010 0

    I used to be a massive Buckley fan and for the longest time considered his “Hallelujah” cover (as well as great parts of Grace, Live At Sin-é and (Sketches For) My Sweetheart The Drunk) “transcendent “, “pure”, ?definitive? etc. etc, but as the years pass the more I cringe whenever I hear his most banal lyrics, overblown production and occasionally contrived vocals. Now, I still like him, but not nearly as much as before, and I can?t help but nurture a sneaking suspicion that although he was surely highly dedicated and passionate about his work, he just wasn’t all that, to tap into The Inevitable Point Of Ridiculous Platitudes, nuanced or mature as a songwriter and artist. Therefore, I am highly grateful that he with this cover finally made me check out and become completely and utterly ravished (in a lovely way, of course) by the guttural, literal and bittersweet genius of The Smiths.

    I know, I know: Morrissey can sometimes be extremely melodramatic to the point of facepalm-esque insipidness, his vocal range is limited to say the least and I doubt that Marr?s musical prowess is on a par with Buckley?s, but damn, such utter and complete brilliance they could (and still occasionally can) be capable of? and how multidimensional, witty and poignant they (to me) appear next to Buckley ? or pretty much anyone else, for that matter.

    To all of you Jeff Buckley lovers out there: I feel ya, I really do, and I certainly didn?t mean for my Smiths-y fangirling to turn into Buckley bashing. He really did have a beautiful voice, an amazing guitar technique and some shimmering lyrical gems to boot (I Know We Could Be So Happy Baby and Opened Once immediately spring to mind) and there certainly was a helluva lot of unfulfilled potential floating around at the time of his tragic and premature demise. Still, the only thing I can say in the ending notes of my rant in this time and age is that all and all, I feel that this is a very respectful and respectable cover but also that personally, I have come to prefer the original ?I Know It?s Over? by The Smiths and, off the record, Leonard Cohen?s sharp, sexy and wryly magnificent ?Hallelujah?.

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