Mumford & Sons continue to enjoy astonishing chart success (over 1MM copies of Sigh No More pushed), alongside an interesting penchant for contemporary indie band covers. (Clearly they’d like your attention while the mainstream world stakes its claim.) Last year it was a stomping makeover of Vampire Weekend’s “Cousins,” and today VH1 reveals the English folk rockers’ mildly folk-modified take on “England,” a song from the National’s High Violet. What it lacks in Berninger’s baritone it delivers in British pronunciation of “Los Angeles.” Watch it, from their VH1 Unplugged session:

(H/T VH1 Blog)

Comments (34)
  1. uggh, leave the national alone. that annoying nasal whine is the antithesis of Matt B’s gorgeous deep voice. Completely kills the understated moodiness of the original.

  2. Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

  3. Joshua, enlighten us to your superior tastes?

    • Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

      • ratllin’ cages.

      • You’re not very nice… Just saying.

      • Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

  4. i would like to apologize for my previous comments, they were rude, and unnecessary.

  5. Joshua, love the new My Morning Jacket album. Going to see them in Portland next week. I also dig Mumford and Sons and The National is probably my favorite band, but M&S’s stripped the soul from this song.

    • how bout this, i will buy you a drink at edgefield, and we can forget about mumford & sons and this silly commenting business, and revel in the beauty that will be, MMJ.

  6. ddogdunit  |   Posted on Jun 15th, 2011 +7

    Dear Joshua,

    I hate to dignify a troll such as yourself with a response – but I felt as if I had to step in here. I actually brought myself to clicking on your facebook page…and saw that you liked MUSE’s facebook page.

    So, you lose.

    Sincerely,
    A Hipster Who Is Better At Being Condescending Than You (It’s Not Hard, You Like Muse)

  7. The tempo’s too fast. I think that’s what ruined it. Mumford needs to be more thoughtful in his interpretation. This is not a hoe-down song. It’s a stormy weather reflection.

  8. I actually really enjoyed this. And I’m a huge National fan, and not an M&S fan at all!

  9. i had a conversation tonight with a friend wherein we decided that you automatically win any argument if you shout out “ARGUMENT WON” and slam your beer down on the bar/table/whatever immediately afterward. that having been said…

    that national is great, mumford blows, MMJ is legendary, and muse is good in a “i secretly enjoy them and don’t really talk to anyone about it” kind of way.

    ARGUMENT WON!! *slam*

  10. That was awful at the beginning but it did pick up some steam towards the end. I really don’t like Mumford, and like The National a lot, but this could have been worse.

  11. Matt Bellamy is a pretty darn good guitar player and Muse does some cool soundcrafting with synths. But overall, they sound like a band created by some 50 year old major label exec who’s previous specialty was signing boy bands but heard Radiohead’s “The Bends” 7 years too late and was inspired to switch it up a bit. There are no “lightning in a bottle” moments, all their songs seem overly polished and contrived. Their live productions are cool…lots of lazers ha.

    Btw- I thought the line was “afraid of the heights…stay the night with the sit-ins.” If nobody minds, I’m going to keep singing my version.

  12. failing at harmonies

  13. Also, anything sung with an English accent actually makes it sound worse. I don’t get the weird American mind set of anything with an English accent = axiomatically good. Let’s get over our colonial hangover.

  14. Not a good cover

  15. Every time I hear this band they sound like they are rushing. No matter the song. This is no exception. Calm down, guys.

  16. I hate everything mumford and sons is but…I kinda enjoyed this. The song has always been my favorite from high violet, anda fresh take on it is cool.

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