atomic

Comments from atomic

I liked it :( Seriously, though, Weston Road Flows, Controlla, U With Me?, Feel No Ways, Faithful, Fire & Desire, and Too Good all feel like jams I will jam hard at some point. Drake letting himself be vocally outclassed by an out-of-nowhere Jeremih on With You was fun. I dunno... there's stuff to like here -- really! Still enjoyed Tom's writing (as always).
+9 |
April 29, 2016 on Premature Evaluation: Drake Views
A lot of people seemed to hate this song completely based on the title, and I find that perplexing. Drake writes a song about his relationship with hip hop. The song samples Wu-Tang Clan. He names it "Wu-Tang Forever", which is both a cool thing to do (almost like a 'Thank You'), and basically proves that, yes, Wu-Tang is forever: They're influencing the next generation of hip hop artists. Anyway, I dig it. Looking forward to "Nothing Was The Same."
+1 |
September 13, 2013 on Drake – “Wu-Tang Forever”
B.O.A.T.S. II! I know, I know, some people are just too good for 2 Chainz. But if you can get through 'Fork', 'I Do It,' or 'Black Unicorn' without smiling, then I just don't know what to tell you. Janelle is the right pick, though, as I'm pretty blown away by her album.
0 |
September 10, 2013 on Album Of The Week: Janelle Monáe The Electric Lady
I am so deeply in love with this track. I can't wait for their tour to start (in addition to putting out one of 2011's best albums, Cut Copy also puts on one of the greatest live shows I've ever had the pleasure of seeing. I would highly -- highly! -- recommend going when they're in your town).
+3 |
September 10, 2013 on Cut Copy – “Free Your Mind”
YES! Finally! Ahem... Sorry: This is just one of the more exciting (and unexpected) lists that Stereogum has done. I would have tried to find a place for 'The Wolf is Loose', because that thing is a fucking monster of a track. (Then again, I think I like 'Blood Mountain' a bit more than you do; to me it's a better 'Crack The Skye'). Still, you included 'Circle of Cysquatch,' which is the objectively better song and so I don't think I can complain too much. As for the top two: Dead on. 'Blood and Thunder' and "March of the Fire Ants' (do-do-dodo-do-do) are basically the purest distillations of what Mastodon's catalog has to offer, which I think you summed up pretty damn well in your introduction: The metal world has had a pretty awesome decade (and honestly, who would have expected that after 'nu metal'?); however, it's a decade that happened largely while (because?) metal closed its doors to outsiders. To their credit, Mastodon never closed any doors, and that is why they are awesome and why I am happy you made this list.
+3 |
September 6, 2013 on The 10 Best Mastodon Songs
"How about this guy?!" "How about THIS guy?!" If you can get that kind of reaction out of Mr. Letterman, you know you're at the height of the game. And you wouldn't want to let Mr. Letterman down, would you, TVOTR? Just announce your next LP and be done with it already. My fragile psyche can't take much more of this.
+1 |
September 6, 2013 on Watch TV On The Radio Play Letterman
Granted, I'm not in the music business, and haven't spent a whole ton of time thinking about the best way for Rick Ross to get 'Mastermind' off the ground. That said, the solution seems simple: It's time for Rick Ross to do another song with Diddy. 'Holy Ghost' and 'New Bugatti' were magic. Also, this seems like as good a place as any to bring it up... "B.O.A.T.S. II": Next week's Album of the Week, or next week's Album of the Week?
0 |
September 6, 2013 on Rick Ross – “No Games” (Feat. Future)
Will do -- The thing that struck me about this track was actually its 'live'-ness. So if they can pull off that kind of energy on album, I''m excited to see what they can do in front of an audience. Between this and your most recent Black Market (Skeletonwitch/Howling Wind/Windhand, specifically), I've had plenty to keep me busy. (Haven't even gotten to that Recluse track you mentioned yet, and Cobalt wrote my favorite song ever*). *'Gin'
+1 |
September 4, 2013 on Earthless – “Violence Of The Red Sea” (Stereogum Premiere)
M. Nelson: Please keep doing what you, because holy shit. And here I thought a second pass through 'Colored Sands' was going to be my Metal Geek-out Session of the Day.
+4 |
September 4, 2013 on Earthless – “Violence Of The Red Sea” (Stereogum Premiere)
Coming out with two of the most amazing songs I've heard all year and then not releasing an album would just be cruel. Come on, TV On The Radio. Come on!
+2 |
August 27, 2013 on TV On The Radio – “Million Miles”
This is absolutely perfect. I just can't believe it's been more than three years since 'Subiza.'
0 |
August 7, 2013 on Delorean – “Destitute Time”
Alright, so between this and "Supersoaker" could we all just fall back into KoL's rugged, Southern arms? I can barely even remember what we were fighting about in the first place.
+13 |
August 6, 2013 on Kings Of Leon – “Wait For Me”
The engineer at Soundcloud who invented Soundcloud comments deserves Comedy's Most Prestigious Award.
+2 |
August 6, 2013 on Drake – “Hold On We’re Going Home”
Early on in our relationship, my girlfriend and I went on a road trip. At some point during the drive, I put on "In Rainbows." '15 Step' starts up, and she says, "This is the song from 'Twilight'!" That is all.
+18 |
August 5, 2013 on Deconstructing: The O.C. And Indie Rock Gentrification
Yes, laughing at and making fun of Degrassi -- a show that was primarily meant for pre-teens and teens to make sense of all the crazy that goes through your mind as a hormonal adolescent -- makes you so much better than Drake. And I'm sure when he was writing this fucking monster jam, "Dreams Money Can Buy", "5 AM in Toronto", "The Motion", his verse on "Versace", and the entirety of "Take Care" he was just pacing around the room, impossibly worried about earning adam antine's respect. Someone take back his Grammy. Dude has failed adam antine, and so he has failed us all.
+3 |
August 1, 2013 on Drake – “All Me” (Feat. 2 Chainz & Big Sean)
Big Dawg, if you're taking 2 Chainz seriously, you're doing it wrong.
+1 |
August 1, 2013 on Drake – “All Me” (Feat. 2 Chainz & Big Sean)
Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck. This thing is a monster.
+1 |
August 1, 2013 on Drake – “All Me” (Feat. 2 Chainz & Big Sean)
This song starts out awesome, and then gets continuously more awesome until you know they're just showing off. Please come out with a full-length, TV On The Radio. We require more Vespene Gas.
+1 |
July 31, 2013 on TV On The Radio – “Mercy”
I love that album so much. I would agree that it's not their best, but I revisit it often. It's one of those albums that you can only make either ridiculously early in your career or ridiculously late in your career, because a song like "Ambulance"? A 7-minute closer that follows a 7-minute song called "Wear You Out"? That shit takes gumption to pull off -- it takes a belief that you're the best-in-the-world-and-ain't-nobody-ever-gonna-do-it-better, and that's the kind of thing that tends to get eroded with age, wisdom, and the day-to-day monotony of life. God, I love that album so much.
+2 |
July 31, 2013 on TV On The Radio – “Mercy”
Damn I really missed these guys. This is awesome.
+1 |
July 26, 2013 on Basement Jaxx – “What A Difference Your Love Makes”
I see it's been addressed. My apologies. Carry on, then.
0 |
July 24, 2013 on Album Of The Week: Fuck Buttons Slow Focus
Just stopped by to say that yes, yes, 'Slow Focus' is a fine choice (although I'll go ahead and echo the consensus: I prefer 'Tarot Sport'), but HOLY HELL CAN WE PLEASE TALK ABOUT THE WEEKEND'S ALBUM? It has thoroughly blown my mind. I can barely piece together my thoughts. So much so that I HAD TO RESORT TO ALL CAPS TWICE IN THE COURSE OF A SINGLE COMMENT.
+2 |
July 24, 2013 on Album Of The Week: Fuck Buttons Slow Focus
As a Baydestrian, this makes me so proud. I don't know why I never made the connection, but ScHoolboy Q fits in perfectly with the Bay Area Rap aesthetic.
+2 |
July 19, 2013 on E-40 – “All My Niggas” (Feat. Danny Brown & Schoolboy Q)
I would suspect that a number of people here use Spotify/Rdio the way that I do: Listen to as much new music as humanly possible, and support the bands you feel compelled to support (most recently Speedy Ortiz). Admittedly, although I consider myself an ardent music fan, I haven't really reflected on the moral and economic implications of my Rdio subscription. That said, Thom's argument seems predicated on the assumption that if Spotify didn't exist, then more money would end up in the pockets of new artists. But I don't know how true that is (I'm not necessarily disagreeing -- I honestly don't know). If I didn't have Rdio, I might buy marginally more music, but I would probably listen to a hell of a lot less, and so I don't know really know if it would be better or worse than the current state of things. As for the underlying economics, I would look at it this way: The technology sector is wonderful (it's the sector in which I'm gainfully employed), BUT! A lot of tech companies are able to raise capital on the assumption that they'll be profitable "IN THE FUTURE." Because of this, they can do things that seem ridiculous, like try out new business models at a loss for a bunch of years, years that would bankrupt a more traditional enterprise like a restaurant or a factory. If we assume consumers are better off because Spotify/Rdio exist (a reasonable assumption, since they wouldn't be paying subscription fees if they weren't), then either these companies are converting investor surplus into consumer surplus, or turning an entirely different group's surplus (i.e., new artists) into consumer surplus. We benefit, but if Spotify/Rdio are still unprofitable (which I am assuming they are), and they're still operating, then someone is necessarily losing. Thom would argue that the people losing are new artists, and he's closer to the ground than I am on these issues so I might even take him at his word. A little economics and finance for your Monday afternoon.
+3 |
July 15, 2013 on Atoms For Peace Pull Music From Spotify
Thanks! This is why I enjoy Stereogum so much. Great writing that, in turn, leads to great discussions. You and the rest of the 'Gum team do an excellent job.
+2 |
July 12, 2013 on Deconstructing: Deafheaven, Disclosure, And Crossing Over
Solid article. I think you basically got to the heart of the issue when you noted that because of the Internet's whimsical, echo-y feedback loop, certain things -- even things that might have previously been considered "fringe" or "outside"-y -- become part of the conversation, and everyone feels the need to have an opinion. Since most people don't have the requisite context for developing an opinion on a black metal album, they take their cues from the tastemakers. The herd then develops a consensus, and so on and so forth, in that fashion. This conversation actually reminds me a bit of Arrested Development Season 4, which happened thirty years ago in Internet Time. It's impossible to say this without sounding like a douche, so bear with me, but I watched the show when it was on the air. I loved it. I told all of my friends, and, of course, they never watched. So it was really just kind of bizarre to see the Internet (my friends included) in an uproar about this thing that I once loved but that (seemingly) no one had ever seen before. Now it's entirely possible that the show would've been wildly popular if it existed when social media were more of a thing, and I'm happy it's found ex-post success, but still: The fact that it was the talk of a town for about a week, only to disappear into whatever the next conversation happened to be -- Yeezus, Magna Carta Holy Grail, the Mad Men Season Six finale or whatever -- is still very strange to me. And don't get me wrong! I love the Internet. I am currently writing my thoughts and people are going to read, react, and maybe even reply to something I didn't say but that they imagined I said: That's awesome! And I also think it's also awesome that it's opened up these fringe-y worlds (black metal, dance music, mid-aughts comedies, etc.) to so many people. I mean, it's almost certainly opened up all the weird music we like to a wider audience. In so many ways, that's great I think it's never a bad thing when someone's world is changed because he encountered something that in the past he likely would have needed to seek out. At the same time, and I'm probably long past the point of being on topic, I really don't like "The Cult of Now" aspect, since I think it necessarily makes it harder to form lasting (and important) critical impressions. The constant churn results in things reaching a massive audience, but never really becoming part of the cultural cannon.
+8 |
July 11, 2013 on Deconstructing: Deafheaven, Disclosure, And Crossing Over
This album blew my mind in every conceivable day. These guys need to continue making music together. The universe demands it.
+10 |
July 2, 2013 on Album Of The Week: El-P & Killer Mike Run The Jewels
I can't believe Spice 1 is on this thing -- so fucking dope. As for the album itself, half-way through it's about what I expected. That's not at all a bad thing. By way of comparison, the reason I listen to Freddie Gibbs is the same reason I listen to Amon Amarth in metal-land and The National in "indie"-world: I know exactly what I'm getting into.
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June 20, 2013 on Stream Freddie Gibbs ESGN