Ass-Kicked89

Comments from Ass-Kicked89

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January 20, 2017 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
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January 20, 2017 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
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January 19, 2017 on Gorillaz – “Hallelujah Money” (Feat. Benjamin Clementine) Video
@cheap_suit_jr_jr Dave Longstreth is 15 years into his career. In 15 years, Animal Collective went from Spirit They're Gone... to Painting With . In 15 years, Bjork went from Debut to Volta. In 15 years, Radiohead went from On a Friday to Kid A/Amnesiac. In 15 years, David Bowie went from David Bowie to Let's Dance. We could go on all day; I think that you probably get the point I'm trying to make, but if not, let a motherfucker breathe! Adding on "I know, I know they have a lot more albums than that" kind of misses the point of the project. It's best to imagine Dirty Projectors as Dave Longstreth's pseudonym the way that David Bowie is the pseudonym of David Jones. You have rotating musicians under the same umbrella but the spiraling vision/direction really belongs to one person (Nine Inch Nails and Trent Reznor is probably a better analogy). At least wait until you hear the whole album ( and maybe revisit the albums released before Rise Above) and the actual context of the singles before you start saying uninspired and Bon Iver. I'm with you on not feeling much for Bon Iver's music (I think that he's obviously talented but prefer him as a wing man in a smaller dosage) but he and DP sound world's apart in influence and both vocal and music arrangements to my ears. Quick related-tangent/bone-to-pick, can critics (paid and unpaid) stop saying x sounds like y when they aren't even a year apart in release? I fucking hate "we're in a post-_____ world" declarations when x and y were created over the same time period in their own little bubbles (they're obviously reacting to their own music, the world, and other music, so I 'm saying relative to each other). I'm not mad. On the contrary, this is 2/2 for me. Let's go, 2017! Burn in Hell, 2016. Fuck Donald Trump.
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January 5, 2017 on Dirty Projectors – “Little Bubble” Video
Exactly! I don't know much about Chazelle but the little I do know indicates to me that so far in his young career, he is writing what he knows and the casting of Stone and Gosling in a relatively smaller project like La La Land is a "no duh" move that works for prestige and business. I'm with your train of thought that Rostam has noble intentions and is mostly trying to stay in his lane but I wonder if he has said anything about representation to the creative team of writer Brit Marling and his writer/director brother Zal Batmanglij. I enjoyed their first two movies together and have only watched the first episode of their new series, The OA (for which Rostam has music composition credits), but Brit Marling and a straight white guy appear to be the leads in every project (again I just started the series but it appears to be the same case with slightly more diversity than their movies). I'd wager that he hasn't said as much primarily because they are family, but also because he knows that those are independent passion projects where they are essentially writing what they know, targeting a specific audience, and basically at the beginning of their careers. I would love to see more people like me (black), Rostam (Asian/gay) (Ha Moonlight, the best movie I've seen so far, kills a few birds with one stone), and other minorities in leads roles but at the same time I recognize there is a vicious cycle in the film industry (like most American institutions) where money does the talking. Which demographics in America have traditionally had the money and power to not only get movies made that are mirrors to their worlds and the ones they imagine but also which audiences have traditionally had the economic viability to "vote" for these movies with their dollars? Trying to sink a movie like La La Land is sort of self-sabotage in that studios are more likely to take the wrong lesson going forward that musicals are toxic, don't finance them. I honestly don't see too many present day solutions besides celebrities with money and power starting their own studios (like Brad Pitt did) to give platforms to people without those opportunities. You could harass younger writers and directors but vitriol should be saved for those with actual money and power like top-tier directors, studios, and casting directors. But once the money starts to flow to finance the bigger projects, it's important to remember who that money is coming from, what their expectations and pull are, and what both success and failure could mean for you and people "like you". Of course, the music and entertainment industries are similar on the surface but their business models diverge in many different manners. I obviously don't speak for a majority of black people because we and other populations aren't as monolithic as people like to pretend, but like Shabani noted below, the black friends and family I know care more about tangible economic power than being represented on the big screen. Don't get me wrong, it's nice, (and it makes perfect sense for those fighting that battle in their creative field to do so publicly) but even switching over for a quick political analogy, getting Obama elected looks fantastic, but the way the 2007/08 financial crisis DEVASTATED black homeowners/communities and decimated black wealth among the myriad of other shit that's continued to happen, became public knowledge, has gotten worst, and yet, still looks to get even worst, he becomes just a symbol that extraordinary people can ascribe towards (completely leaving acceptance out of the equation). I love Rostam's music and salute his intentions but we (the under-represented) have MUCH bigger existential problems than La La Land (what an appropriate title for this point), that I would recommend tweeting at 100,000 followers.
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December 21, 2016 on Rostam Criticizes La La Land’s Lack Of LGBTQ Characters And People Of Color
Hey Califonia Lovin, I dropped a long Lupe recommendation in the James Taylor thread. If you've already heard Tetsuo & Youth feel free to ignore it.
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December 21, 2016 on Rostam Criticizes La La Land’s Lack Of LGBTQ Characters And People Of Color
I actually think that Tetsuo & Youth (Lupe's last album from last year) was a fantastic return to form. Ignoring whatever else was going on in the arts or around the world, it definitely got overshadowed not only by coming out between Black Messiah and To Pimp a Butterfly but also coming out the same day as B4.Da.$$, Vulnicura, No Cities to Love , and Viet Cong. Those albums plus Panda Bear Meets the Grim Reaper (came out a week earlier) are everything that was competing for my attention during January and then a few weeks later, I Love You, Honeybear and If You're Reading This, It's Too Late were released in February. So, I imagine with that very stiff competition, Lupe was cut out (understandably based on his previous two albums) for everyone with varied musical tastes including the arts blogs I follow. If you haven't heard the album, it does suffer from being too long (like all of his albums) but that is more due to there being three songs that are over eight minutes long than there being obvious filter (although, IMO, most albums that go over fifty minutes can usually stand to cut a few songs as this one can). Most importantly, though, he sounds focused in a structured album (seasons that get longer like a Chicago Requiem for a Dream ) and the production is much better than the two previous albums (probably his biggest musical problem next to the career-derailing record label fights and penchant for controversial statements). If 78 minutes is too long for one sitting, try dividing it into 20-30 minute EPs by cutting off before the season changes and let me know what you think.
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December 21, 2016 on James Taylor Cancels Philippines Concert Over President’s Brutal Anti-Drug Campaign
Yeah, I was surprised that the article left out the best part of the story that he decided (correctly) to use the voice of God.
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December 21, 2016 on Mark Zuckerberg Built An AI Assistant To Play RHCP, No Nickelback
@raptor jesus On the other hand, the same broadcast media outlets don't mind publicizing war in Syria and skewing the U.S. role in those sectarian conflicts to garner support from its citizens while comparatively, blacking out our complicity in war crimes and mass slaughter in Yemen. While the former is a shitshow with too many cooks, the latter is essentially a one-sided affair where our ally is using bombs, "intelligence," fuel, and our unwavering support to bomb the fuck out of what is essentially the poorest country in the Middle East. I don't need to ask which of those three conflicts we have more control in stopping. Off-subject but tangentially-related, the relationship between the CIA and large media outlets in the U.S. and history of Psy-Ops on the American people is why I have been skeptical (and ranting like a madman here and there) since the first "Russian Hacks" (If you're going to subvert and pervert FOIA standards and do everything in your power to punish whistle-blowers and block adversarial journalism, I'm going to call it Karmic phishing for transparency) happened months before the Podesta emails began to be published. I agree that the messenger and his/her/their potential intentions are important but shouldn't be used as a means to route damning information. Like the War in Iraq before (and that in Libya and the upcoming sequel: War in Iran (and if we're lucky, the exciting conclusion WWIII) our politicians (*ahem*and plutocrats and policy-makers and partners) have a tendency to set the table like a shit magician who just needs a willing audience that will listen to the words, go along with the trick, shut-up, and not pay any attention to the hands. TLDR: I suspect that the U.S. has much bigger fish to fry (and larger bucks to make) than pay any mind or dare divest any resources to what is tragically happening in the Philippines. Remember that it's not about "spreading Democracy" as much as it is about what's in it for US (and by US, I of course mean the masters and the puppets who need the peasants but don't really give a fuck about them).
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December 21, 2016 on James Taylor Cancels Philippines Concert Over President’s Brutal Anti-Drug Campaign
"I just left the strip club, got some glitter on me/ Wifey gonna kvlt me, she the female OJ (Chris Ojeda)/ Y'all don't feel me, man this ain't okay/ [Trump Tower], take a shower, new clothes, I'm reloaded" Kanye always has his bases covered (unless Amber is at bat). Yeezus is a fan of both the New Testament and the Old Testament.
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December 21, 2016 on Testament Guitarist Questions Whether Kanye West Is Trve Kvlt
(S)Layers http://anotherimg.dazedgroup.netdna-cdn.com/442/azure/another-prod/350/1/351710.jpg
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December 20, 2016 on St. Vincent Talks “Deepest, Boldest” Album Coming This Spring
Thanks to Stereogum's Band to Watch profile on Algiers, I caught them live last year with Omni (who, beside The Drones, Preoccupations, and Exploded View, quietly released one of my favorite angular guitar records this year) in Atlanta. I thought that Algiers sounded great on record but live, HOLY SHIT, it's a revelation! They have so many weapons at their disposal: THAT voice, THOSE lyrics, THOSE guitars, THOSE samples, and now Matt Tong (probably in my Top 5 of All-Time Favorite Drummers) who they added after completing their first record. I'm honestly expecting Algiers' new album to be along the lines of Return to Cookie Mountain and anticipate them being one of the great emerging explicitly sociopolitical rock bands not just because they are in the right place at the right time and in tune with the times, but primarily because they kick major ass.
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December 14, 2016 on The 101 Most Anticipated Albums Of 2017
Surely, someone has written the article/paper/thesis/book that ties together the ties that bind Kanye West and Donald Trump and "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy" and "Watch the Throne" and "Yeezus" and "The Life of Pablo" and Donald Trump's ascendance to power and "Conservative America"'s Rejection of West and "Liberal America"'s Rejection of Trump and "Liberal America"'s Rehabilitation of West and "Conservative America"'s Rehabilitation of Trump and Capitalism in America and "Who Will Survive in America" and Education and Entertainment and Mental Health and Ego and Id and Ignorance and Arrogance and Stigmatization and Celebration and Normalization and "Obama's Nation" and White Power and Black Power and Projection and Television and Confusion and Division and Destruction and the other Ions of the World... I'm sure of it.
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December 13, 2016 on Kanye West Meets With Donald Trump At Trump Tower
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December 6, 2016 on Stereogum’s 100 Favorite Songs Of 2016
"Finish him!" 11. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds - Skeleton Tree 12. ScHoolboy Q - Blank Face LP 13. The Avalanches - Wildflower 14. Kendrick Lamar - untitled unmastered. 15. Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam - I Had a Dream That You Were Mine 16. Mitski - Puberty 2 17. Anderson .Paak - Malibu 18. Saul Williams - Martyr.Loser.King 19. Nicolas Jaar - Sirens 20. Kanye West - The Life of Pablo 21. Preoccupations - Preoccupations 22. Charles Bradley - Changes 23. Deakin - Sleep Cycle 24. Junior Boys - Big Black Coat 25. Childish Gambino - Awaken, My Love! Tomorrow is Bleak but Bright: Chance the Rapper, Jamila Woods, Noname, Saba, Joey Purp, Adia Victoria, Margaret Glaspy, Car Seat Headrest, Exploded View, Fat White Family, Gallant, Kelsey Lu, Moses Sumney, Kaytranada, James Blake, Vince Staples
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December 4, 2016 on The 50 Best Albums Of 2016
My cream and red Braids' t-shirt that is a print of all of the lyrics to Deep in the Iris is my favorite band t-shirt. They've blown away the headliner (Baths, Toro y Moi (my hometown heroes), and Purity Ring) of every bill I've seen them play. There are certain bands like Braids (Ava Luna comes to mind and I'm hoping this doesn't happen to Weaves) where you would think the power of their live performance would be able to propel them to a HUGE audience, but I think that it is just the nature of our digital/streaming age where they are helped and hurt by everyone having all of the music and getting more every week that they and many other bands don't get the attention that we think they deserve. It'll be a shame if Braids don't get the call to the majors, but if they do, I know that they'll be amply prepared.
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December 3, 2016 on 25 Great EPs From 2016
Ha, it's interesting what the untouchables are for different Radiohead fans (and those of other artists). On my hypothetical HTTT edit that I made below, I was going to say cut "Go To Sleep" and leave "Backdrifts" (because both I like the latter more and it flows into "Where I End and You Begin" better) but I have a feeling that in a fan survey, more people like "Go To Sleep" than "Backdrifts". I do stand by my opinion that even though its a perfectly fine song (with a fantastic groove), "A Punchup at a Wedding" probably drags the sequencing of HTTT the most and that might just be do to its placement more than its actual tempo or length.
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
Mr. Gruff the Atheist Goat and Saturnian on Status Ain't Hood last month brought up the point that if Kendrick Lamar made To Pimp A Butterfly during the Obama administration, imagine what he would make during the Trump administration. I'm thinking as oddly prescient as Radiohead have been throughout their career and besides A Moon Shaped Pool being an appropriate swan song to exit, what might they come up with during and after Brexit and a Trump administration?
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
This is an interesting version of HTTT. I did the opposite for TKOL (primarily for road trips), although, I do like it for its relative brevity. Having two versions of everything would be nice. For this "HTTT Alternate Tracklist", I was surprised to see that "The Gloaming" made the cut (a song that I didn't "get" until hearing it played live in '08 where Colin's bass both anchors and drives it) and "We Suck Young Blood" didn't, but overall, I dig it on first listen. My criticisms would be that "2+2=5" probably works best as an opener (either side A or B) or the closer (side B), and I wouldn't have dared touch the original sequence of the final three songs ("Scatterbrain" might be my favorite penultimate song of all time. Bird up to RJ). My opinion on the length of HTTT changed over the course of a few years from thinking it was too long to feeling like it had to be as long and messy (my favorite word of 2016 (and a fair description of my writing style)) as it was to 1) be an outrage reaction and reflection of the complex times and events that influenced it and 2) match the perfect artwork made for it. The one song I wouldn't lose any sleep over cutting is "A Punchup at a Wedding". If I were to make a similar edit to the original side A sequence, it would pain me but I could live with cutting "Backdrifts". Then, you have a 46 minute HTTT. To reach the 45 minutes or less classic LP time, you could also cut "I Will" which does flow into "A Punchup at a Wedding" ("I Will" into "Myxomatosis" has a very cool jump cut feel), is kind of like a coda to "You and Whose Army?", and as the reverse to "Like Spinning Plates", sort of belongs more to Radiohead's Kid A/Amnesiac phase. I guess those cuts would be like the Hollywood Compromise version of HTTT, and it still sounds damn good to my ears (I might be too easy to please when it comes to Radiohead) TLDR: I love thinking and talking about sequencing too much like all you other music nerds. Just have a look at my history (please don't) where I've shared edits for First Impressions of Earth, The King of Limbs, and The Life of Pablo. I guess that I accepted Hail to the Thief before becoming a tinkerer of tracklists.
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
Holy fuck...can you picture people LARPing after rolling on a combo of rando festival drugs? I imagine it would look something like this: http://www.newcontinental.net/UserFiles/Images/field%202.jpg
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December 2, 2016 on This New EDM Fest Is Also A Renaissance Faire
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December 2, 2016 on This New EDM Fest Is Also A Renaissance Faire
You're right that he has always done that when singing even in his earlier years. I wrote it off as being apart of his improv and theatre-kid background. And you're right that it works very much to his advantage on this new album because it was in the nature of those who strongly influenced the album. Dammit, you're such a wise man.
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
Do you remember the Ok Computer/In Rainbows Golden Ratio Theory? God, being a Radiohead fan in college made for fantastically strange times. I had the honor and pleasure of taking the first Radiohead course my university offered and that spring semester coincided with the release of The King of Limbs. So, everyone wrote 10+ page papers analyzing that album. I imagine it was like a Stockholm Syndrome for some but I genuinely loved TKOL when it was released and still love it in the present tense.
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
What is Childish Gambino's "over the top bullshit"? I'm not really a stan, just a fan, and he (nor anyone for that matter) doesn't needs my defense, but I'm curious.
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
"The ghost of Mandela, hope my flows they propel it/ Let these words be your Earth and Moon, you consume every message/ As I lead this army, make room for mistakes and depression/ And with that being said my nigga, let me ask this question: When shit hit the fan, is you still a fan?" -Kendrick Lamar, A Mortal Man
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December 2, 2016 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
This guy fucks! http://imagizer.imageshack.us/a/img923/8574/YAkRKx.jpg
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December 2, 2016 on Stream Childish Gambino Awaken, My Love!
Thanks for taking a trip back to go forward, Gambino. It's love at first listen for me. Awake, My Love! sounds like CG is conjuring and channeling black spirits both dead and living, both familiar and foreign from the past, present, and future to deliver messages that his idols, peers, and progeny have and will continue to send: really love one another, know your true enemy, fight the power & fear & hate, empathy is the key to understanding, our survival depends on imposing but not insurmountable obstacles, and keep chasing the stars. Lyrically, the album is primarily bleak and a mirror of our times but not too in your face (with the aforementioned ideas being littered in the few moments of levity throughout the album) with Gambino's voice singing (not rapping) and constantly shifting shapes and altered states while the music tries to be the escape to get high and fly away like so many funk and soul classics of the late 60's and 70's (there is one interesting stylistic detour from the throw-back amalgamation that plays like California English: Part 3 (and is appropriately titled "California")). The dark clouds finally lift in the final one-two punch and it's gorgeous and Gaye. So, yeah, I hope that this artistic breakthrough/leap/evolution/whatever is the first step in a new old path forward for DG. He and his crew has revitalized some fantastic vibes and sounds on this album in times of despair similar to those faced by many of the spirits on this album and their ancestors before them. Like Glover on the final song, I know that it's going to be tough but I'm optimistic and ready to fight for the future.
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December 2, 2016 on Stream Childish Gambino Awaken, My Love!
Understanderable, that's how I usually am.
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December 1, 2016 on The 50 Best Albums Of 2016
@dansolo Agreed on her performances. I'd only ever been an outside admirer of Beyonce so while I've definitely helped destroy dancefloors to her singles over the last decade, I still haven't fully watched her self-titled "visual album" (I'll check it out this month) and I honestly might not have watched Lemonade (I'm a proud owner of 2 versions (great decision by Bey)) if it didn't air on HBO. My first viewing was on a whim with my black parents (funny that my dad might be the biggest fan I know) so, despite the Formation video and her superbowl performance we were blind-sided by the direction of the project and that was an unforgettable first experience for me. I was blown away, especially with the inclusion of the Warsan Shire poetry, but for the reasons given, I get why you (and other fans) might not have been as impressed. My little soapbox was aimed more at people who feel that Lemonade is overrated but have only heard the music (sorry again smizzbomb if that doesn't include you). In their defense, maybe Lemonade should have been released in "visual album" format only like Endless. But then in defense of critics paid to make lists, it's sort-of part of their job to have watched the " visual album" and it's tough to divorce the images and full narrative from the music once you've watched it.
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December 1, 2016 on The 50 Best Albums Of 2016
@smizzbomb Because Lemonade is both a "visual album" and an "album album", it's tough to judge for a list of just albums (kind of like including a short film in an image competition). It is probably the album I've listened to the least of my top twenty, but watching and hearing the "visual album" is my #1 favorite art experience of 2016. So, my compromise was to place it at #3 on my list. If you did a survey (please don't) of how a person was first exposed to Lemonade and whether or not he/she has experienced the "visual album", I think that you'll usually be able to predict how a person feels about it. I could see Lemonade venturing into the realm of pretension for some people, still, but it's a trip worth taking before calling it overrated. I apologize for making my assumption if you watched it before making your comment.
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December 1, 2016 on The 50 Best Albums Of 2016