jtl

Comments from jtl

It's ok to love this album. It's not a guilty pleasure.
+13 |
February 20, 2013 on Give Up Turns 10
Wow this song. It'll have to settle for being my favourite track of next year.
0 |
December 10, 2012 on Phosphorescent – “Song For Zula”
I'm just looking at all these lists, and there is always a few "controversial" omissions or orders, and it kind of smells like bullshit. There is always wiggle room for the definitive order of a best songs or best albums list, but to use your website's influence to try to re-write history under the guise that "music lists are subjective" feels wrong. "My Girls" is one of the best AnCo songs, "Heroin" is one of the best Velvets songs, and "Pablo Honey" is the worst Radiohead album. Everyone knows this. It's not subjective. The editors must know that this kind of stuff will cause a shitstorm, so it feels like they publish bogus lists for the page views and comments. It's a similar mentality to that LA Weekly article a few weeks back about 'the worst hipster bands' or whatever. I really like lists, by the way.
-7 |
October 25, 2012 on Radiohead Albums From Worst To Best
You're sacrificing integrity for the sake of page views and comments.
-2 |
October 25, 2012 on Radiohead Albums From Worst To Best
Leonard Cohen is the best. Suzanne is my favourite song, by anyone, ever.
+7 |
October 19, 2012 on The 10 Best Leonard Cohen Songs
The Dead Prez/Two Weeks mash-up is just incredible.
+2 |
September 15, 2012 on The 10 Best Grizzly Bear Songs
Does California Stars count? Because it should.
+4 |
August 16, 2012 on The 10 Best Wilco Songs
A Shot in the Arm is easily a top 5 Wilco song (if not top 3). And A Ghost is Born is vastly underrated.
+4 |
August 16, 2012 on The 10 Best Wilco Songs
You Are Free is leaps and bounds better than Moon Pix.
+5 |
August 2, 2012 on The 10 Best Cat Power Songs
This is great. but are we not going to discuss "Anything We Want", which also came out and is on soundcloud? Because it's even better.
0 |
June 5, 2012 on Fiona Apple – “Werewolf”
There should be no reservations here. This album is great.
+4 |
March 21, 2012 on Premature Evaluation: Beach House Bloom
I think you meant to post at Brooklyn Vegan.
0 |
August 24, 2011 on Bon Iver – “Holocene” Video
"Miss You" sounds a whole lot like Yeasayer
0 |
August 24, 2011 on The Rapture In The Grace Of Your Love Premature Evaluation
I'm between this and Radiohead's "Seperator"
+1 |
August 18, 2011 on Bon Iver – “Holocene” Video
This just further illustrates how Radiohead is so obviously tops. These live versions are amazing, the album is amazing. I'm hoping more people come around to it.
+3 |
July 10, 2011 on Watch Radiohead – The King of Limbs: Live From The Basement
It's a difficult situation for Stereogum to be in actually. On the one hand, it does seem like they are praising this guy's music without adequately addressing how problematic his lyrics are (putting him 'on a pedestal'). On the other hand, Tyler is news and they have to write about him. This is especially true because they are a blog and so they let people (like you) voice your opinion. It's important for Stereogum to post about Tyler precisely so that you can talk about how offensive his lyrics are. Still, I don't know about other publications like Pitchfork. They're not a blog, and their features and reviews (not necessarily their news) are definitely crowning Tyler the Creator. I think that P-fork is assuming their readership will see beyond the offensiveness or be thoughtful about how problematic it is, and so they're don't feel a need to address it that much. Maybe they see it as a 'preaching to the choir'-type situation if they address it in a review or feature. But I think that's kind of a reckless thing for P-fork to do. It should be addressed.
+2 |
May 16, 2011 on Tyler, The Creator Responds To Tegan & Sara
I agree with this. But I'm less interested in stopping the criticism towards Tyler and more interested in talking about how we're all to blame. It's not necessarily fair that Tyler is getting the worst of this criticism, considering there's all kinds of other musicians/ people guilty of this language, but he's also not innocent. And it's obvious why we're singling out this one individual. He's the talk of the town. He's simply very good at provocation. We all want to get our two cents in. The crappy thing about this issue is that he's obviously very awesome otherwise. Tons of energy and confidence and skill.
+2 |
May 16, 2011 on Tyler, The Creator Responds To Tegan & Sara
I'm semi-certain that Tyler doesn't hate gays or wish harm upon women or condone violence, but that's not the issue. The problem is that there is a systematic marginalization of gays and women (for example). It's a real problem that exists and hurts many people. When a rapper casually makes gay jokes or rape jokes he/she may not mean it, but they are perpetuating the harmful language. You say 'fag' for example, you might not mean it, you might not even mean a gay person. But 'fag' is still a hurtful slur towards gay people, and by joking about it you're making it an ok word to use. It's not ok to use.
+7 |
May 16, 2011 on Tyler, The Creator Responds To Tegan & Sara
I think "Albatross" is an amazing song. Hope the rest of the album follows its lead.
+1 |
April 20, 2011 on Wild Beasts – Smother Premature Evaluation
I keep refering to 'taste' because I'm trying to differentiate between taste and goodness. The enjoyment (or taste) of an album is subjective, the goodness of the album is not. I guess it's not mathematical objectivity, but its objective through observation. If you look at music critics and avid listeners of indie rock (in other words, experts) it's clear that the majority of them think this album is good. They know their shit, they think it's good, therefore its good. It doesn't matter if you don't like it. Go to metacritic.com to see my point. This album has got an 87 rating, based on a compilation of various critics ratings. Their are 3 middling reviews ( or 3 other Brandons), but for the most part its got a great score. The user rating is high too. This is an observational way of determining an objective goodness.
-2 |
January 27, 2011 on Double Take: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs
Actually yes. I think it's a lot like math. My biggest point is that there is a difference between personal taste and good music. Admittedly, both The National and Arcade Fire suit my tastes, but I also think they are objectively good. This idea comes from Kant (which is really pretentious to drop here, I know). There's no such thing as "beauty is in the eye of the beholder". There are good albums and bad ones and in between. Who decides? Learned individuals, experts, and maybe the test of time. Enough critics and listeners who know what they are talking about have already determined that this is a good album. You don't like the Suburbs? That's fine. It's great actually, I believe in people discussing they're personal tastes. But's it's an objectively good album. You just happen to not like it. I know that people will hate this. But I believe it. To hammer it home: You might not enjoy Shakespeare or Picasso, but you know it's good. Same goes.
+1 |
January 27, 2011 on Double Take: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs
Well, thanks for that. But that's not really the point I was trying to make.
0 |
January 27, 2011 on Double Take: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs
I think saying that the lyrics are "high school poetry" is condescending. You're suggesting that high school poetry is bad. I realize that you (Brandon) lean towards more 'difficult' music, like the Haunting the Chapel stuff and CocoRosie. That's fine, I like some of that too. I know that you don't want to come off as only liking weird shit, and that's probably why you started this column by stating you like some of the 'popular' albums. But we know you lean towards that stuff. But what I don't get is how you pick and choose which big rock album to praise. I think The Suburbs and High Violet hit all the same bases. Obsviously, the lyrical content is slightly different, but both records bring up the same emotions. They reach the same parts of my brain. And musically, they're obviously pretty close. What I am trying to say is that I'm dubious of this "music is subjective' argument. It's a pretty big argument on most music blogs. And I think this column exists to prove the 'subjective' point. You're in a position of power, writing for this blog, and so you can say: "Hey look, not everybody loves this album. Look at me, I'm a music critic on a popular music site and I don't really like the Arcade Fire. Music IS subjective after all." Anyways, all I'm saying is that I think it's kind of bullshit. I honestly think that there is good music, bad music, and music in between. I think this album is clearly good music. And if you don't like it, it's because of some other reason, not because of the songs. In your case, it might be your personal taste. Your taste seems to lean towards metal and noise and outsider stuff, with the odd popular record thrown in. But I think there's a difference between taste and good music.
+3 |
January 25, 2011 on Double Take: Arcade Fire – The Suburbs
I also get the feeling that this will be the prevailing attitude towards the album, and that sucks.
0 |
January 19, 2011 on Iron & Wine Kiss Each Other Clean Premature Evaluation
I think you should do an immediate 'double-take' on this one.
0 |
January 19, 2011 on Iron & Wine Kiss Each Other Clean Premature Evaluation