News 

The Flying Lotus/Kendrick Lamar collab “Never Catch Me” is one of the highlights from FlyLo’s upcoming album You’re Dead, and now it has a great video to go along with it. The Hiro Murai-directed clip follows two kids who start off by jumping out of their coffins at a funeral and launching into an rapturous schoolyard dance while the adults sit around looking jaded and somber. It follows them out into an actual schoolyard as they jump into a hearse and drive off into the sunset. It’s a beautiful video, thought-provoking and a lot of fun, and you can watch below.

Migos just released the first track from their next mixtape with Rich The Kid, called Streets On Lock 4, which followed the third iteration which came out earlier this year on 4/20. The track title and the song itself is based around the fakewatchbusta Instagram account, which calls out rappers who wear fake jewelry. Basically, the crew is saying they can’t bust ’em because all their jewelry is 100% authentic and genuine. Listen below.

Mary J. Blige will release her London Sessions album at the end of the November. One of her collaborators on the record was Sam Smith, who co-wrote at least two songs. The first was lead single “Therapy,” which we heard last week. Now here’s another, “Nobody But You,” which sounds a lot like what Smith does on his debut album (and I’m pretty sure that’s Smith’s vocals chopped up in the background). Listen to it below.

Pink Floyd are releasing The Endless River later this year, the group’s first album since 1994′s The Division Bell. Well … David Gilmour and Nick Mason are releasing an album, the remaining members of Pink Floyd who still go by that name. Roger Waters is the only other living member of the group, and he’s been getting a lot of questions about the new album. Except that he left the group 29 years ago in 1985. Waters posted on Facebook to clarify: “I had nothing to do with either of the Pink Floyd studio albums, Momentary Lapse of Reason and The Division Bell, nor the Pink Floyd tours of 1987 and 1994, and I have nothing to do with Endless River,” he wrote. “Phew! This is not rocket science people, get a grip.” Read his full post below, where he also gives an update on what he’s been up to.

Bush are releasing Man On The Run later this month, their second album since they reunited back in 2011. They just released a music video for lead single “The Only Way Out” and it’s one of those backwards music videos: the first part is played in reverse and then they pressed the digital fast-forward button in Final Cut or whatever and let the video play out in normal time. It may be one of the 17 best (only?) backwards music videos of all time! Whereas the trick seemed kind of cool back in the ’90s when Spike Jonze did it for the Pharcyde’s “Drop,” now it just seems kinda lazy. It’s like they had an idea for a big-budget video with explosions and stuff but could only afford half of it and decided just to run with it. Maybe the preorder for their new album isn’t doing so well? Though that $2,000 handwritten “Glycerine” lyric sheet did sell. The video is below…

This week, Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga’s new duets album, Cheek To Cheek, debuts at No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart for the week ending on 9/28. This makes the 88-year-old singer the oldest person to have a No.1 album, breaking a record that he set three years ago for his Duets II album, which also featured a collaboration with Gaga. Cheek To Cheek sold 131,000 copies and closely beat out Kenny Chesney’s The Big Revival and Barbra Streisand’s Partners.

Following Ryan Adams’ virtual radio silence after 2011′s Ashes & Fire, this has been a stacked year: we’ve had the self-titled new full-length and the start of a single series, which has included the 1984 EP and the “Jacksonville” 7″. Now, Adams has announced the next entry in that series: the “Vampires” 7″, which will include four new songs. That’s the cover art above. Check below for the tracklist.

Here’s another jazz-infused psych-pop excursion from J. Fernandez’s Memorize Now EP. Like “Cosmic Was” before it, the Rhodes-laden “Close Your Eyes” is too singular to fit neatly into a specific musical lineage. The music tumbles all over an interior realm, rarely settling into one place for long, beholden to the whims of its creator’s imagination. As Fernandez tells Impose, the project is inspired in part by prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces: