Check Out Cass McCombs’ Protest Song & Jarvis Cocker’s Essay For The People’s Climate March

The People’s Climate March, the largest climate change rally in history, is happening this Sunday, 9/21 in New York, and various musicians are playing a part. For instance, Cass McCombs teamed with the Chapin Sisters for a gleaming old-fashioned folk singalong simply entitled “Protest Song.” Over hand-strummed campfire chords, McCombs and the Chapins harmonize on such pointed questions as “I wonder how?” and I wonder who?” and “I wonder when?” You can stream or download it below.

Cass McCombs And The Chapin Sisters – “Protest Song”
(via Pitchfork)

Occasioned by the march, Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker also wrote an op-ed for The Guardian called “Climate change is real. Want to live? It’s up to people like you.” His piece starts out like so, in characteristically saucy fashion:

Do I really have to march? It’s actually a serious question: I mean, marching’s rather … military, isn’t it? Bit aggressive. Bit too much like what the baddies on the other side would do, don’t you think? Wouldn’t you rather saunter? Or stroll? Mince, even? A hop, a skip or a jump — anything but stern-faced, humorless marching. And let’s face it: we’re probably going to need a sense of humor.

Later on, he gets to the core of his argument:

Back in 2008, I sailed the coast of Greenland on a vessel chartered by the organization Cape Farewell and saw the effects of global warming firsthand. It exists. On the way home, we spent a few hours in Reykjavík’s international airport waiting for a connecting flight back to the UK. I bought an ashtray made out of lava. When I got back home, I turned the TV on. It was the morning of the stock market crash and I learned that Iceland, the country I had been visiting not four hours previously, was effectively bankrupt.

That gave me a strange feeling because I hadn’t noticed. The sun had still been shining as I walked through the airport terminal. People had gone about their everyday business as usual, there had been air to breathe and nothing to betray the cataclysm that had befallen the entire country. How could that be? This was a financial crisis! The Big One! THE ECONOMY was at risk! Why was the world still turning?

You whisper now, but could it be that there is a higher power than … THE ECONOMY? I know that sounds a bit sacrilegious, but could it be that THE ECOLOGY is actually the biggie? That maybe having air to breathe, water to drink and land to inhabit could be more important than the fluctuations of the FTSE or the Dow Jones? It’s just a thought — a thought that most people instinctively understanding[sic], but that the political classes have yet to grasp.

As you can see, it’s an insightful, entertaining read. Check out Cocker’s whole piece here.