BixMeister

BixMeister

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Last night I dreamt that Elon Musk was launching his rocket to Mars and I was somehow involved in the launch. It looked more like a Tokyo skyscraper and arrived at the launch site in pieces that were put together like LEGO. The launch was moderately successful but moments later angry aliens invaded earth. They didn’t arrive in UFOs but instead came in a swarm of little green men and green robots who snatched up earthlings, some dropping them from great heights. The fact that I was naked in most of the dream is the least surprising element. My dreams are sometimes a forecast of future events. If the day comes when Musk gets his wish, and starts transporting “workers”to Mars be warned that it might include nudity. And I elevate this song to 7/10 because events it foretells, might include nudity.
Spot on Tom. I remember doing a one off DJ gig at a hotel bar in a northern Minneapolis suburb when this was Number One. The big hits at the time were Wild Wild Life by Talking Heads, Fight for Your Right to Party and this one. The dance floor was packed for those three, and everyone of every age knew the dance and performed it using white people rhythm, I.E. poorly. Still, I packed the dance floor.
Yeah, I support this two and I supported switching the dial when it came on the radio, or even turning the damn thing off. It’s easier now to do that. With Sirius/XM in my Jeep I just have to hit one of the buttons on my steering wheel to go to the next preset, or to turn the volume up or down. With that I can designate my steering wheel actions and how they relate to my scores. 1-2/10 = slam on that preset button as quickly as possible. 3-4/10 = hmmm, I think I’ll turn the volume down and ride this out, hoping for something better. I might mute a cringe part. 5-6/10 = I’ll ride this out, hey I kinda like that part but I know there is a part that keeps it at this score. 7-8/10 = Yeah, flick that volume up a notch and sing what I know. 9/10 = Two notches up. On some lines I’m shouting along. 10/10 = An electric feeling runs through my body and directly to the finger on the toggle and says let’s test those speakers. Meanwhile, I’m building a LEGO White House while watching the inauguration. There might be day drinking later on but that’s the extent of my multi-tasking today. Take care of yourselves and may your day be filled with songs and moments that find an electric current run through you and test the speakers of your life.
Poison lives up to their name in my opinion.
When I lived in Minneapolis a local DJ on a small wattage radio station had a weekly show and he was a huge Bing Crosby devotee. His thesis was that Bing Crosby was the first natural singer, since he learned to use the microphone to its best advantage for intimacy. Before Bing singers had to project to be heard over the musicians, but Bing understood that he could use the microphone to croon, and connect, without over singing it. I watched "Going My Way" recently and there is a scene where he is talking to a young female singer. She sings a song, smiling and vamping the entire time. Bing tells here to do it again, but without all the smiling and vamping, and instead think of what the words are trying to say. It's a good representation of what Bing did to change music, leading to Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and eventually Elvis, etc.
When I shopped at Northern Lights Records in Downtown Minneapolis, there was a chain smoking employee who looked like Keith Richards warmed over. He had this schtick where he'd make fun of the Nu-Punks who'd hang out in front of the McDonalds in the Uptown area. He'd place his hands on his head in line, fingers up in an almost Jazz-hands way, then he'd mumble inanities. We'd laugh knowingly, but it stuck with me. Later when Hair Metal started we simply changed the hands to the front, the back of the hand placed against our forehead, the fingers straight up mimicking Aquanet laden bangs. In summer, when life in Minneapolis revolves around the lakes, the Lake formerly known as Calhoun, now Bde Maka Ska, was lined with beaches segregated by well defined yet unstated divides. There was the Gay beach, and the almost Gay beach for those who were curious. There was a beach where mainly blacks congregated, and a beach for windsurfers. On the southwest corner you'd see guys with long stringy hair, and women with enough Aquanet that the ozone layer directly above was completely obliterated. The boomboxes at each beach reflected the musical tastes of the denizens. When walking the shoreline, I'd try to make it through the hairband beach as fast as possible. I like a variety of music, some more than others, and I can find some hair metal to champion, but the outlook is bleak for me when you count what hits Number One.
Mr. Plow is correct with their science here. I can honestly say I remember hearing "Wonderland by Night" on the radio when I was three. I'd hate to do the math re: what percentage of my life it was.
Last year I was listening to the Prince channel on XM satellite radio. Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis were playing songs and telling stories. There was a lot of The Time and Prince tunes of course, but the stories were the reason to listen. Prince was an amazing mentor to them, and they learned much by watching him in the studio. Jimmy and Terry noticed that Prince’s levels were always in the red on his mixing board, so they took this as gospel when they got their own chance. After they had produced a few albums, albums that caused a split between mentor and mentees, Prince visited them in their studio. He noticed their levels were always in the red and admonished them for it. “We watched you,” Jam replied. Prince then let them know that his board was specialized for him, and the red lights weren’t causing distortion, etc. So, by accident, Prince caused Jam and Lewis to push the audio boundaries and create their unique sound.
Omg meat raffles. I’ve experienced them a few times and never won.
Zzzzzzzz 😴 I saw Boston “live” after their debut album. There was a good laser light show, but everybody in our group claimed they could just as easily sat at home dropped the needle on the album and flicked the lights intermittently. Antiseptic at its best. And this song. Zzzzzzzzzz 😴
A few songs back I claimed that I had a good batting average for couples when it came to DJing their wedding reception. Off the top of my head, I can only think of one couple who I DJ’d for whose marriage ended in divorce. There are two marriages in 1986 I can’t confirm one way or another because on one I lost contact with the couple, and the other was for a couple I never met before, and haven’t seen since, probably with good reason. A few months before I had DJ’d for an 30th anniversary party a coworker had for her parents. It was a night heavily peppered with Doo-wop and Motown and classic 60s Rock. People drank and danced, fun was had, and I basically made pocket change, because I was doing it for a friend. A few weeks later my friend told me that one of the party goers wondered if I would DJ for her daughter’s wedding. After playing phone tag with the mother, I agreed to DJ for $175. We agreed that I would be paid when I set up. The night of the wedding, I drove to the boondocks southeast of St. Paul, and then drove 10 miles more, eventually finding the reception hall. I set up, using speakers I borrowed from my brother-in-law’s shop. Setting up was the first time I officially met the couple, and members of the family. The mother had given me general direction, so I had a good variety of music packed. I reminded the mother about my fee, she said “After the dollar dance.” She had emphasized the importance of the dollar dance, so I had a metric ton of slow dance songs ready. Growing up the dollar dance was a given for me, but I have since learned that it isn’t universal. The dollar dance is a chance for everyone to dance with the bride or groom, so long as they fork over a dollar. The best man and maid of honor collect the money, and then you dance with the bride or groom, until it is the next person’s time. When the dollar dance started at this wedding, I believe the kegs had been flowing, maybe a little too much. I say this because I played slow songs for 45 minutes. I can’t remember everything, of course, but I know I played “Your Song,” “You Make Me Feel Brand New” “The Way You Look Tonight” and the then current Number One, “True Colors.” Women danced with the bride, guys jokingly with the groom. I kept the CDs and LPs ready if there was someone waiting in the line, I was ready to play all night. When you play music for 45 minutes, and people wait in line, paying at least $1 each, 2-3 people per minute, times two, you know they raked in the dough. I reminded the mother about my fee, she walked away. Soon after the dollar dance a fight broke out in the parking lot. The mother of the bride was wasted and ready to call it a night. I reminded her that I needed to be paid, she stumbled away. I played until I was supposed to quit to a dwindling number of drunk wedding goers. As I was packing up, I cornered the mother of the bride to ask for my $175. She all but ignored me as she was yelling at her new son-in-law for an undisclosed reason. Luckily, I recognized my coworker’s parents and had them intercede on my behalf. Now my coworker was no shrinking violet, but the rest of the family made her appear to be one in comparison. “Pay the DJ what you owe him. I know you made more than that in that freaking dollar dance,” my coworker’s mom yelled at her sister. That night I took home $200 in ones, fives, tens, and twenties. I never ran into any of the wedding party again, but I’d bet on divorce. Since then, I only DJ for close friends
That is one origin I’ve been looking for. When I found out that Good Times bass line was based on Kool and the Gang that solved one mystery
Fun fact: Rear Window has a Number One artist and a Number Two artist. Grace Kelly’s duet of True Love from High Society hit Number Two and the piano player across the way is Ross Bagdasarian who hit Number one twice as David Seville solo and The Chipmunks.
It was also the debut of her new streamlined look.
I watched the video last night in preparation for today and I couldn't help think of the contrast you pointed out. I know there is an agreement to keep politics out, but... WE CAN NOT NORMALIZE WHAT HAS HAPPENED TO OUR COUNTRY. The very fabric of our country, our strength is built on cultures coming together. It is built on aspiring. Those are the dreams. However, it was also built on the backs of others, on slaves, on indigenous genocide. Vote however, up vote me, give me the thumbs down, I don't care. We can't normalize a coup on our country. We can't normalize antisemitism, racism, fascism and Nazism and excuse it any longer, or claim it as economic anxiety when the motherfuckers (see far below) took private jets, or went back to their suburban Chicago McMansions after ransacking our democracy.
Your rankings are spot on. Janet has at least two 12s coming up including one of the sexiest songs of all time.
Her "Bass" and "Break" have become endlessly sampled and used as DJ and remixer tools ever since 1986.