BixMeister

Comments from BixMeister

“ Have any of you had an experience close to the one that plays out in ‘Centerfold?’ Other than, it’s likely, Bix?” Long story made short. I knew a guy from an internet chat room, met him a few years later, saw his centerfold the next year, saw a snippet of his porn a few years after, then saw him in the audience during an episode of Kathy Griffin’s My Life on the D List. I also had a coworker who went on to become one of the biggest gay porn directors of all time.
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
It took them about two albums to become entirely different.
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
I guess having to pay for ice cream isn’t too bad after all.
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
Bingo. It was a Motown homage musically.
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
Meanwhile on the Hot Soul Chart Skyy – “Call Me” Stevie Wonder “That Girl” Look at the label of the DIsconet version of “Glad to Know You” and you’ll see another timeless Dance/Soul jam from 1982, Skyy’s “Call Me.” How many songs are called “Call Me” countless is my amateur guess. Skyy might win for best bass in a song called “Call Me” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4APcR7mEIc Stevie Wonder’s “That Girl” was his biggest hit on the Soul Chart, holding the Number One spot for 9 weeks. It was released as part of his greatest hits album “Stevie Wonder’s Original Musiquarium I” and it fits right in with the classics on the album. Stevie often gets a bad rap for his 80s hits, but this one hits an undeniable groove. In my opinion it is one of the five best Stevie Wonder songs of the 80s. We’ve already heard the Jermaine Jackson song “Let’s Get Serious” and we’ll hear the best Stevie Wonder song later on in 1982. The only problem is, it isn’t a Stevie Wonder song. It also didn’t hit Number One, stopping at Number Two. The Number One song that kept him from the top? “That Girl” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eagQKwVendA
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
Meanwhile on the Disco Top 80 Songs that made me who I am, part 457.6 “Chaz Jankel – “Glad to Know You” “Ai No Corrida” “3,000,000 Synths” The late 70s, early 80s had unique artists making inroads on the Disco chart. Probably the most idiosyncratic would be Ian Dury who got massive DJ play for “Hit Me With Your Rhythm Stick” “Reasons to be Cheerful, Part 3” and “Spasticus Autisticus.” This was Punk Dance in feel and execution with more than a dollop of quirk added by co-writer Chaz Jankel. In 1981 Chaz went solo, kept the quirk, and created the Number One Disco/Dance song of 1982. Quincy Jones quickly did a cover of “Ai No Corrida” bring it to the charts ahead of Chaz’s version. However, there was depth in Jankel’s album and “Glad to Know You” owned the charts for 6 weeks. In some ways, it feels like “Reasons to be Cheerful, Part 4” but I won’t complain, because I have many reasons to be cheerful about both songs. Like Abba’s “Lay All Your Love on Me” “Glad to Know You” also benefited from a Disconet Remix. Clubs like Paradise Garage took advantage of the dubbier remix. I like every extended minute, using it often in my mixes. Have I mentioned that I love this song, because I love this song. It’s worth checking out his version of “Ai No Corrida” and “3,000,000 Synths” as they are each great and reveal a different side of Chaz. Or if you are in a dubby clubby mood, listen to “Spasticus Autisticus” by Ian Dury. You’ll have many reasons to be cheerful. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J8LvYKXdUe0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2kbXw_7LjE
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May 27, 2020 on The Number Ones: The J. Geils Band’s “Centerfold”
Previously/OOOps on the Disco top 80 Madleen Kane – “You Can” I forgot this one when Physical was Number One, Ooops. I have no way to confirm this, but I would bet money that this song was the song they used when they filmed “Flashdance.” You know how it goes, they use available songs to film a scene, then record new songs for the soundtrack. “You Can” by Madleen Kane is a third tier Giorgio Moroder produced artist, doing a second tier version of Donna Summer, yet it still works. But listen, listen to the whip-crack percussion, and if you didn’t hear the Euro-robotic vocals, you could swear it was “Flashdance” without the feeling. I noticed the resemblance when I was doing a mix a few years back. The 12-inch version is structured like a carbon copy of “Flashdance” that was done months before the original. My guess, this is the original and “Flashdance” is the carbon copy. BTW do the kids say carbon copy, now, or is it clone, or something else? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5RfyjfLkUzk
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May 25, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)”
Meanwhile on the Disco Chart. D-Train – “You’re the One for Me” Propulsion has a name; it is D. Train. D. Train got its name from James “D. Train” Williams a nickname he earned on the football field. “You’re the One for Me” has the same energy and power as The Gap Band, but updated with a bit of Electro-Disco-readiness. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6Xqmj5c3hk Looking at the video, you can imagine D.Train on the football field. He’s agile powerful and imposing. There is an element of Teddy Pendergrass in his vocals, but Teddy never met the 80s so perfectly. Looking at the Disco Top 80 charts for 82, I am confident that 1982 is the best year for Number One Disco/Dance Songs, and any year that starts off with “Genius of Love” “I Can’t Go for That” and “You’re the One for Me” as the first three Number Ones, has to be great. Just wait.
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May 25, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)”
Previously on the Disco Top 80 Daryl Hall & John Oates – “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)” You see things in retrospect. Whether it is an overview of an artist that claimed a lot of real estate in your mind for a few years, or a friendship based on impossible expectations that somehow survived. S was my best friend during my Imperial phase. She turned out to be my prototype, and I didn’t realize it. Closeted as I was, S fulfilled the part of the best friend who just happened to be female. We were co-workers, and again in retrospect, I realize she probably wanted more from our friendship. That was the prototype. S. was the first, she was intelligent, athletic, taller than average. With those attributes she could have been my sister. She was from the old money part of Edina. People from Minnesota know what that mean, but S actively fought that stereotype. S and her family adopted me, and every year I would decorate their Christmas tree, then attend their Christmas party. The family would gush that someone who worked in Dayton’s display department decorated their tree. S. and I rolled our eyes as the old money would praise my work. A month or so after “I Can’t Go for That (No Can Do)” hit Number One, I was helping remodel one of the Dayton’s in a NW suburb. It so happened that tickets for Hall & Oates were going on sale that morning, so I timed my break for ticket sales. Brooklyn Center wasn’t the type of suburb that would go for H&O, so I was first in line and got front row tickets. Then a few weeks later, I won the Breakfast Quiz on WLOL and won backstage passes for the H&O concert, plus 10th row tickets. I gave those tickets away, because hello, I had front row tickets. Of course, I went with my sister, and S. because she was my best friend. Dork alert, as if you need a dork alert for a guy who would bring his sister and his best friend back stage to a H&O concert, but I did sort of have a pron-stache back in 1982. If there is a H&O song that transcends their output, it is “I Can’t Go For That.” With its thick beat, it has never been far away from any BixMix. A few years back it was revealed that Michael Jackson took inspiration from “ICGFT(NCD)” for “Billie Jean” and I went “DUH.” Again that is a case of retrospect making things clear. Pro-tip, always go for the 12-inch mix. Half a decade ago, S contacted me on Facebook and asked if I would be her guest at a family wedding in Duluth. We were both married to the man of our choice, but S knew her husband wouldn’t be up for the wedding. She originally was going to attend the wedding with her mom, who was excited to be attending her first same-sex wedding. Her mom died before the wedding, so S. knew I would be her perfect date. Three-plus decades melted away as we danced, chatted and mingled. The DJ played a bunch of our 80s faves, it suddenly felt like 1982/83. The highlight of the night was connecting with an old friend and having her acknowledge that she had figured out early that despite what her family wished, I would not be part of her “old money” Edina. I wish she would have told me so I would avoid the issues down the line when subsequent versions of my prototype would fall for me. S. saved the photo and posted it on Facebook a decade or so ago. I don’t have her permission to post it here, therefore I’ve doctored it. https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-qvQ2BXQk3Go/XssMGEUNrqI/AAAAAAAAAZc/fTa8Ys7lAyc1CbD8GaivRKWN4qBHH1ifACLcBGAsYHQ/s320/hall%2Band%2Boates.jpg
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May 25, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “I Can’t Go For That (No Can Do)”
Brigit, you always lead me down a path, thank you. I will think of you every time I hear DSB, then tune quickly to something else.
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
In my life it’s a ten with a negative in front of the digits. Cliche after cliche just kills it for me.
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
And I could go the rest of my life without hearing it. Never liked it when it was new do to the endless strings of cliches that were over-sung. Now add in overplayed and yeah I’m good.
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
I don’t know if your name is a connection, but a coworker went to Catholic grade school with Hawk of the Road Warriors. There is a fun State Fair story I’ll tell in a few virtual years.
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
Meanwhile on the Disco Top 80 Tom Tom Club – “Genius of Love” “Wordy Rappinghood” Tom talks about an artist’s Imperial Phase where everything seems to work, and I’m wondering if a music-lover is allowed an Imperial Phase. Looking at the charts, thinking about how I interacted with popular music, I realize that late 81-85 is my Imperial Phase as a music-lover. Almost every day after work I’d go to Hot Licks/Northern Lights and dig through the import singles, indie-12-inches, new releases and even filling in the blanks on older music. Sometimes I would stop at Shinder’s and scope out the latest Billboard. Music was part of happy hour, house parties, club going, and those weekends where I needed to stay at home and lay back. Digging through the bins meant that I often heard songs and artists long before they appeared on the radio. “Genius of Love” was one of those imports I bought. Now think about that. Tom Tom Club, an American act, broke through because they sold 100,000 copies of the import 12-inch of “Genius of Love” on Island Records, forcing Sire to sign them in the U.S. If I could say one song is my jam, it is “Genius of Love.” If I was forced to pick my favorite song of the 80s, “Genius of Love” would be on the shortlist. It’s the sound of someone fan-girling and fan-boying about Funk, Rap, Rhythm and Blues and Soul. The coolest thing, it worked. It hit Number One Disco, Number Two Soul, and was the basis for two big rap songs, “Genius of Rap” by Dr. Jeckyl & Mr. Hyde and Grandmaster Flash with “It’s Nasty” plus it inspired a song we will hear about much later. To paraphrase one of the characters in Armistead Maupin’s Tales of the City series, you can have a hot apartment, hot lover and hot job. One out of three is good, two is better, and three is almost unheard of. I’d add hot music to the mix. I had two out of four during my Imperial Phase, alas I missed the hot mark with regards to lover and apartment. But sometimes good things come to those who wait. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCWCF19nUhA My Imperial Phase as a music-fan ended, but the music and memories are still with me. Thanks to the Tom Tom Club, I have a song to jam to. Oh, if you’ve been playing along, you know I have the love of my life. That’s the “Genius of Love.”
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
My “Physical” mondegreen. “Let’s get Physical, I wanna get an enema.” “Physical” was popular during the Aerobics scare of the 80s. The lower level of the department store I worked at was being remodeled. While it was half empty, they invited Richard Simmons to lead an attempt at earning a World Record for the largest aerobics workout. A year later I was doing displays on the 2nd floor and had dressed two mannequins who were riding bikes up the columns at the entrance of our Merona shop. Merona was a label doing athleisure clothing before athleisure was a thing. Their spokesmodel was Richard Simmons, and the Merona salesperson in our store was the store gossip who earned the apt nickname “Merona Barrett.” I realize only people of a certain age will remember that Rona Barrett was the leading gossip columnist of the time. Merona Barrett would often stop me and whisper, “What’s his/her story?” Anyway, one morning I went across the skyway to the IDS for breakfast, and returned to someone yelling “Oh Bix, I just LOVE your displays.” That was how I met Richard Simmons.
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May 22, 2020 on The Number Ones: Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical”
So we saw him less than a week apart in completely different circumstances. That is what makes this place great.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
I watched it the other night. I saw him twice in a week on that tour.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
Yes, I've written about "The Rock" a few times.. It was a go-to for many a night on the dance floor in 79-81.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
I think it had a lot to do with teenages getting into two tons of metal with very little safety built in. For a while it seemed that there would be at least one teenage fatality per year in my small town.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
Quick question. Did anyone else have trouble with comments on the mobile version of the site? I kept on getting the rotating blue squares of death, so I had to sign on to the computer to post.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
Oh, God was there in many of the cuts. A comment on YouTube said they learned the Lord's Prayer from Prince's "Controversy" which made me smile.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
Some Disco housekeeping: Monday’s post also meant I missed out on a few Disco Number Ones on two ends of the Disco spectrum. Patti Austin in a Quincy Jones production brought state of the art soul Disco with Do You Love Me. The Brothers Johnson play on it, so check it out. Following that was “Menergy” by Patrick Cowley. We’ve heard Patrick Cowley on various Sylvester hits, and this is his biggest solo single, going all the way to Number One on the Disco charts. “Menergy” as you might guess from the title, is a Gay disco electronic extension of his Sylvester sound. With its lyrics about “the boys in the backroom, loving it up, shooting off energy” there is no mystery why “Menergy” failed to chart on the Top 100. I’d remove at least three points for the Castro clone camp of the lyrics if I were to score it. If you want to check out Patrick Cowley, I might suggest you check out his 15-minute remix of “I Feel Love” which was a massive bootleg about this time. It played a crucial role in keeping “I Feel Love” in the public eye and elevating its status as a groundbreaking recording. Patrick has his hands in two more Top 10 Disco songs, hopefully then I can give him a fitting tribute. Neither of these songs hit the Top 100, which was common in 1981 as numerous Soul and Disco Number Ones failed to chart on the Top 100. Don’t worry, we will be hearing from Patti, and Disco/Dance music will again influence the Top 100.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”
Thanks for the positivity re: my post on Monday. Among the responders was Irish who worried that reflecting on his recent deaths of his parents would be hijacking my post. The strength of the TNOCs crew is that we relate music to our lives in often vulnerable ways in an amazingly safe environment, considering this is the internet. Pop music is popular because it creates a shared experience. We’ve shared many family stories, baring our hearts and sometimes exposing scars. The cliché is that time heals. Or should I say that the truth is time heals. Just this week I had a dream that my dad was in. I was the age I am right now, and my dad was older, yet strong and healthy. For my TNOCs friends who have lost family, or those who are dealing with parents whose health is not the best, I hope you experience what I have, memories of a healthy, vital father, and not his illness.
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May 20, 2020 on The Number Ones: Daryl Hall & John Oates’ “Private Eyes”