cstolliver

cstolliver

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Great job! On a side note, I love how Keith's "98.6" gets rounded up on the spreadsheet to "99." (I was looking for Toto.)
I like the Joe Cocker song primarily because of its use in "Bull Durham."
Entering my personal charts this week in 1988 -- http://crownnote.com/charts/cstolliver/music-of-a-lifetime-top-25-454 -- at No. 25 (en route to a No. 8 peak) is what would be the final hit on my chart for Canadian singer Corey Hart. I liked his debut "Sunglasses at Night" but sometimes found his music too "soundtrack wannabe" (as in the case of his biggest Billboard hit "Never Surrender"). This time out, though, he channeled the music though not the lyrical themes of Bruce Springsteen's "Brilliant Disguise" to good effect on "In Your Soul." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMdm72iE2Fw
No surprise that I like Richard Marx's work more than Tom does (although I am happy to see most of his early songs have at least a few supporters in TNOCS). And "Don't Mean Nothin' " is definitely better than a 2 (I'd give it a 7). But Tom and I kinda see eye to eye on this one, as well as the one that should have been a No. 1, "Endless Summer Nights." I'd give this a 5 -- it's all right, and I wouldn't turn off the radio station for it, but I also don't crave it or wouldn't select it. "Endless Summer Nights," on the other hand, gets an automatic turn-up, especially if I'm driving. It's a strong 9.
I disagree about Richard Marx and R&B in the same sentence ... "Keep Coming Back" is a pretty credible slice of smooth jazz/quiet storm/adult R&B.
I was prepared to give him a little credit for an interracial duet with this theme in 1974, but then I watched the video, which makes it quite clear Odia's just literally on the side and the spotlight is firmly on Mr. Ego. So, nope.
No problem, friend. The Nightshift (and Weekend Shift) welcomes all joiners.
Yep. That was always how I felt when I visited my relatives in south central Pennsylvania during the summers and, at night, caught WLS from my hometown of Chicago...
More like the Scarecrow in Oz ... but he never got to see the wizard.
Presuming our Nightshift buddy irishbearaz doesn't get to it first, I'll have a song or two to post from that first Tracy Chapman album. Those tracks did far better on my personal charts than in Billboard.
I saw Cheap Trick at Chicago's Navy Pier doing a summer show in 1981. They were the perfect fit for a sunny day at Lake Michigan. Not a fan of "The Flame" although I don't hate it the way I do some songs from this time. I agree that "Can't Stop Fallin' Into Love" is far superior. What amazes me is that they had four of the best pop-rockers of the '80s that all fell inches short of Casey Kasem land: "Everything Works If You Let It": No. 44 in 1980. "Stop This Game": No. 48 in 1980. "If You Want My Love": No. 45 in 1982. "Tonight It's You": No. 44 in 1985. The week of May 21, 1988, when "The Flame" burst from No. 42 to No. 33, amid whatever frustrations the band had with the song, there had to be some relief that they broke out of the mid-40s desert.
Pretty sure it was in TNOCS a while back that I learned this group was white. Never occurred to me all those years of listening to "Westbound No. 9."
Between this story and the Tracy Chapman video above, you guys are gutting me today.
Sorry, I hate that remix. But then, I liked the original. So I guess I understand your enjoyment of the remix!
Guess that Boyz II Men song is fitting for you! Congratulations!
I do ... but by George Benson: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tf0ZjN1UPE
Hang in there, buddy -- relief is around the corner (well, the weekend is, anyway).
This week on my personal charts, July 2/3, 1988 -- http://crownnote.com/charts/cstolliver/music-of-a-lifetime-top-25-450 -- Daryl Hall and John Oates follow up their final Billboard Top 10 single, "Everything Your Heart Desires," with another track from "Ooh Yeah!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-BFeM2E2ayA "I'm in Pieces" finds Hall and Oates going back to the future on an '80s doo-wop midtempo tune that wouldn't seem out of place with their original of "Every Time You Go Away," "You Make My Dreams" or "Wait for Me." I never understood why Arista (their new label after years with RCA) ignored it. I will admit it was likelier to be a hit in the early '80s than in 1988. But then, I liked all of the singles from their next album more than the general public, too. As an album track, this was on its way to a No. 12 peak.
I gave it a 9, but I'd give the follow-up, "Hearts Don't Think (They Feel)," a 10.
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