DJEJak

DJEJak

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Alright - the song is an 8, but damn, that video is an 11. One of the greatest dance numbers filmed in the last 50 years. (And filmed like a dance number - you can see the dancers' full bodies, and while there's some music-video quick-cutting, there's plenty of shots that last long enough to actually see the dancing. Twist of Fate - those synths are 1984 distilled. 7 Cum on Feel the Noize - I was a 13 year old boy in 1983. I can not give this less than a 10. (Though the Slade version is also a 10.)
At first I thought "Poor Heart, having to go up against Prince and Madonna the same week." But then I saw what Madonna song they were up against, and I felt better for them.
My Eurythmics theory - all of their later hits get overshadowed in popular memory by Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This.) It was just so unique at the time, and such a breath of fresh air, that everything else they ever did can seem to pale in comparison. It announces itself as synth-based '80s pop in a way few other songs do, especially songs that were that successful. Also, later songs may get misremembered as Annie Lenox solo hits rather than Eurhythmics.
#JusticeForMagic, but I still voted it worse than The Bangles.
"Sister Christian" gets +4 from me for it's use in Boogie Nights.
I gave the first song a listen, but I feel confident in saying that in the future I ain't gonna play Sun City Girls.
Plus several phrases that would be fine on primetime TV. (And maybe one or two that wouldn't.) Maybe they were trying to keep it eligible for YouTube Kids?
That video has some of the strangest censorship ever.
My wife once bought me a blue canary nightlight. It broke, but I still have the fixture. I think the late, lamented ThinkGeek sold it, and it no longer appears to be available.
Even Kevin Smith can not suck the joy and movement out of ABC. Rosario Dawson helps a whole lot, though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkATNuN-nbk
It was coming off of a big blues revival that started in the late-80s - Robert Cray was probably the biggest charter from that cohort, but Bonnie Raitt's resurgence was part of it as well. You also had a lot of early blues being reissued on CD, including Robert Johnson, King of the Delta Blues in 1990.
I listen to this song and think "there's no reason she couldn't have a #1 this year if she wanted to."
Sons of the P, is one of my favorite albums of all time. I highly recommend it to anyone who'd like to dig a little deeper into Digital Underground.
That Bobby Vee song is perfectly pleasant, but I couldn't get past the fact that it was released the same year as "Bringing it All Back Home," "Rubber Soul," and "A Love Supreme."
Indeed. Tom's avoidance of the phrase "No-talent ass-clown" showed admirable restraint. Something no one has ever accused Michael Bolton of.
But were you worried they were going to sell out because it was on a major label?
I love that performance so much, too. There's a moment not long after the trumpet solo where Linnell kind of closes his eyes and has a cryptic smile, like he's willing himself to remember this moment - that if if all falls apart tomorrow, he still got to play on the Tonight Show with Johnny's whole band. (I also like to think that this performance gave them the idea that, "Yeah, maybe it'd be fun to put together a band for touring and recording. We need some guys named Dan.") And it's 31 fuckin' years later, and the guys still like to make music together.
This may be the single album I have listened to more than any other in my entire life. So many great, eclectic, lyrically oblique songs. Birdhouse in Your Soul is a song I can listen to on repeat.
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