Fishhead

Fishhead

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NKOTB saved their best for last with this song, easily the best of their number ones. The production on this one is superior to their previous number ones, the 70’s Philly Soul sound is a great style to ape. The pace is fast, light, and fun, the drums are unrelenting. The synth strings are sharp and concise. Their voices sound strong and more mature here, they sound better combined. The song loses a few points for the awkward rap-song spoken word bridge part and for them still using the “rrrawr” thing, whatever that is. 5.
A solid mid tempo late 80’s type ballad, it has a pleasant melody and pretty good chorus. The beat is simple and kind of stock, it allows the synth line to twinkle. There’s softly strummed power chords that lead into the haunting piano solo. The subtle key change allows Fredriksson to take her vocals from clean and stoic to a more dramatic place, she doesn’t go all the way over the top with it. Overall this is a pretty good song that sticks with you for awhile but then fades away till the next time you hear it. 6.
A pretty bad set of twos for sure!
A big, cheery empowerment anthem is never a bad thing. After giving this song a few spins it’s not as bad as I remembered it being. The opening synth line and piano chords start slow and set up the trios vocal intro. The drum fill that sets up the guitar power chords into the chorus is simple and effective. The vocal harmonies, especially on the chorus make the song stand above other chart fare at the time. I’m pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this song. 7.
I won’t go into Madonna’s cultural appropriation of non-white, gay culture, I’ll leave that to people who actually know and live this experience. I know it will be hard to separate the two, but I’ll try to focus on the music itself. The opening synth line is haunting in a way, the finger snaps set up the house lite beat. The synth strings add another layer of texture under the beat. Madges vocals are solid here, but the rapped verse is awkward sounding. I like how the chorus and beat and synths build to the sudden end. A solid 8.
After what seemed like a never ending deluge of mediocre, over produced, soulless ballads, along comes an out of left field artist who delivered an absolutely fantastic, heart-breaking one. The beauty of the song is in its sparse arrangement, it avoids all the cliches: the synths and strings are barely there, the drums are tastefully restrained, there’s no over the top wanna be hard rock guitar solo. This leaves it up to O’Conner to pull it off with her vocals and she hits it out of the park. She brings the right amount of pain, sorrow, hurt, and longing that the song requires. Maybe the best thing she does is she emphasizes just the right word in each line to make the lyric hit home. Easily the best number one of the young decade and a contender for best number one of the 90’s. 10.
I have zero recollection of this song, there isn’t one thing that even remotely rings a bell. Admittedly I wasn’t the target audience for this type of song which may be why I don’t know it. That being said I wasn’t missing anything. This is about as bad as a limp, turgid, cheesy devotional ballads get. Everything about this song reeks of awful, from the horrid Kenny G sax, to the weepy synth strings, to Pages “my testicles have yet descend” helium vocals. A 1 seems a to generous score.
A prototypical Diana Warren ballad, this doesn’t have much to distinguish it from other ballads of the day. The production and arrangement are pretty standard fare: weepy, tinkling piano, a slow motion rhythm section and soft rock guitar solo. The vaguely Middle Eastern, sitar sounding guitar is a nice touch. Dayne has a decent amount of power to her voice, though she’s no match for Whitney or Mariah. Overall this is a solid, cookie cutter ballad. 5.
This song had a unique sound compared to what was on the charts at the time, a bluesy, country tinged slow burn ballad. The bass and drums have a distinct blues feel to the them. The acoustic guitar has an ever so slight country feel. The electric guitar solos are a straight up blues throwback. Myles sings with the appropriate amount of smokey, sexy, raspiness that a song like this requires. It loses a point or two for me due to two factors: first I’ve always felt the song was somewhat inauthentic for reasons I can’t quite pin down. Second: it gets sung so badly by drunk people at karaoke, they forget the lyrics and shout the chorus in their inebriated state, it makes me want to chop my ears off. Still this is a smokey 7.
A lite, breezy, carefree jam, I can see how artists like Brittany Spears were influenced by this song. I really like the contrast between the upbeat, joyous feel of the melody and the heavy, almost industrial beat that Jam and Lewis were known for. Jackson sounds like she’s having fun singing the song, her vocals have a happy energy to them that’s infectious. 8.
Putting aside the Who Framed Roger Rabbit? video, this song is a pretty dinky sounding piece of dance pop. The beat sounds like a bad preprogrammed child’s Casio keyboard setting but it’s also kinda funky, I found myself tapping my toe to the snare hits and bass guitar. I don’t really buy the lyrical premise of the song either, these two people are polar opposites in every way but the sex must be super so I guess opposites do attract. Her voice has it’s usual girlishness to it, but the guys vocal sounds like he’s a total dick. The rapping (if it can be called that) bridge is just sad. A low 5 for the funky beat.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03lrL9CFWxM Didn't see this posted.
Much like the first number one of the 80’s was still rooted in the 70’s, the first number one of the 90’s is firmly rooted in the schlocky adult contemporary ballads of the pervious decade. Bolton over sings this song loudly, his vocals border into histrionics. It doesn’t help that the lyrics are so self centered and egotistical. The melody and guitar are generic but not all unpleasant. Overall this is an auspicious start to the 90’s. 3.
Our worst ten number ones of the 80's: 10: Endless Love 9: We Built This City 8: I Just Can't Stop Loving You 7:Kokomo 6: Separate Lives 5:Baby, I Love Your Way/Freebird Melody 4: Batdance 3: Do That to Me One More Time 2: Stars on 45 1: Girl I'm Gonna Miss You
The final top ten number ones of the 80's as scored and ranked by myself and my wacky group of 4 other friends. 6-7 would be in my personal top 10. 10: Eye of the Tiger 9:When Doves Cry 8:Jump 7: Billie Jean 6: Another One Bites the Dust 5: Livin' On a Prayer 4: Sweet Child O' Mine 3 West End Girls 2: I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For 1: With or Without You.
And that’s a wrap on the 80’s! It somehow seems fitting that the final number one of the 1980’s belongs to Phil Collins. Putting aside cynicism for a second, this is a competent attempt at social commentary, dealing with homelessness at the end of the consumer decade. The melody is strong, moody, and melancholy. The synth line chimes away in the background, complementing the melody. Collins and Crosby’s vocals are pleasant on the ears. I could do with a little less overdubbing of them though. A nice, semi thought provoking song to close the decade. 7.
The Dukes of Hazard theme Any Nintendo video game soundtrack and music Where's the Beef The sound Transformers make when they... transfrom The epic music when they form Voltron
Wasn’t Spacemonkeymafia the title of a Liz Phair album?
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