LinkCrawford

Comments from LinkCrawford

"Things Can Only Get Better" is wonderful. It soundtracked a trip my dad and stepfamily and I took to the Smokey Mountains/Blue Ridge Parkway that summer. I remember even hearing the 12" mix of the song somewhere on that trip. For some reason I never bought it. Always love hearing it.
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October 1, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
A pat on the back to Alan O' Day.
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October 1, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Exactly! My childhood station (THE Indianapolis AM station in the 70s) was WIBC. I so miss those hours of hearing it pumping out of the transistor radio on the kitchen counter. I found a bunch of WIBC jingles, and those 1-2 minute long mini-songs they would use. They so take me back. I love jingles anyways.
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October 1, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Oooh...I actually really like that one. Absense from 80s radio has made my heart grow fonder.
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October 1, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
On the Hot 100, which began in mid-1958 yes, but there were plenty of solo female #1's on the charts before that.
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October 1, 2020 on The Number Ones: Connie Francis’ “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”
I always say the same about "Smuggler's Blues"--it's my favorite Frey. Better late than never is for sure!
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
I have a funny story about Tchaikovsky's Pathetique. My freshman year at Purdue I played in one of the lesser wind ensembles. Clarinet. I was second chair. We played excerpts from Pathetique for our last concert. And the 1st chair clarinetist DID NOT show up for the concert! Never figured out why since it was the end of the semester. Anyway, that left me to play the very prominent solos--the motif that runs through the 1st movement, a descending melody line, was a clarinet solo. There wasn't even another instrument playing at that point, just me. Luckily it wasn't technically difficult, but I wasn't mentally prepared to be the center of attention that afternoon! I did ok. Other than some stints in community bands, that was the end of my clarinet playing. College was too demanding to spend much time in band.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Scandalous costumes for their day.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
There's a seat by me for "Barracuda". One of the most perfectest classic rawk songs everrrrr.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
It's true. Until the late 70s there was hardly anything on the Indianapolis FM dial, but Easy Listening WXTC (ecstasy) 103 was one of only a few stations, and it was popular. I remember in 4th grade (1979) trying to talk Donna Summer music with the cute girl I sat next to, but she said her mom only let them listen to WXTC at home. I was mortified at such a restriction! And I realized that I probably just sounded like a nerd talking about music she had never heard of. But she was tolerant of my weirdness and we stayed friends.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
For those that never go back that far, some of that old stuff is weird and wild and entertaining.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Oh my goodness! Mac Davis hits me harder. Didn't know that until now. The writer of some lousy songs, but some great ones, too. Elvis' "Don't Cry Daddy" is one of my favorite weepers, and was written by Mac. Dang.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Different tempos, different keys, different genres. How..?
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Yacht rock is an ironically given title--it's all in good fun, but it also happens to encapsulate music that I love. You are not wrong about easy listening. Some people's escape is to go crazy and rock out. For some its to retract into a comfort place and get cozy. Easy listening let people do that. Coming from another perspective, easy listening was also LESS conservative. It may seem weird to some of us, but there is a percentage of the population (or WAS, since I'm probably speaking of folks that were born before 1930 or so?) that had very conservative musical opinions. Hymns and classical music. None of that rowdy jitterbugging jazz that gets the kids all crazy and certainly none of the devil's rock n roll! But eventually they could stomach The Association's "Cherish" in between Percy Faith and Ray Conniff. As times changed more modern acts were absorbed into easy listening, like some singer-songwriter stuff and even lite-rock ballads...like "Crazy for You". You're kind of hinting at marketers cashing in on slightly racist musical opinions of some of the public. I guess that may have been true. But for some of us as we age, the progression of pop culture leaves us behind and we just want to wrap up in a blanket of what feels comfortable to us.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
50 years before this virtual week… It’s May 1935 and the #1 song is “I Won’t Dance” by Eddy Duchin. I already hinted at this song a few entries ago, as the flip side “Lovely To Look at” had already gone to #1. They were both from the film adaptation of Roberta. “I Won’t Dance” was already included in the London musical Three Sisters, but that musical saw no success, so they re-wrote the lyrics and recycled the song for Roberta. I like the song pretty well. It’s lyrics are clever with the singer declaring “I won’t dance. Don’t ask me.” then later explaining, I know that music leads the way to romance So if I hold you in my arms, I won't dance It also namedrops a #1 from 1934 “The Continental”...which I mentioned back then, but forgot that this song also went to #1. I’m still learning. I’m fairly sure that it’s also the only #1 of all time that contains ‘asbestos’ in the lyrics. It’s a good one, though I prefer later covers that revved up the energy of the song more. But here’s Eddy Duchin’s take. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wPMpaN_V9Ec Also 50 years before this virtual week… It’s still May 1935 and the #1 song is “Lullaby of Broadway” by The Dorsey Brothers Orchestra. The song is one of the main features of the movie Gold Diggers of 1935, and one of the best known musical/dance numbers from old Hollywood. The dream/dance feature for this song goes on for more than 10 minutes with a few weird, whacked-out twists that would fit into any 1980s rock video. It also features a massive tap dance segment with a huge cast. Five different versions of the song charted in 1935, and as a standard it has been recorded by countless artists. My introduction to the song was in the Bugs Bunny cartoon “Rebel Rabbit” where in order to boost the bounty price for a rabbit, Bugs starts doing all sorts of radical things. In the scene where he sells Manhattan Island back to the Native Americans the music playing is “Lullaby of Broadway”. This song also introduces us to the Dorsey Brothers. Jimmy (clarinet and saxophone) was just a year older than Tommy (trombone) and the two would pass away just 6 months apart from one another in the mid-50s. Raised in a musical family in Pennsylvania, the two became session musicians in the mid 20s, started recording in the late 20s on various labels, and were formally signed to Decca in 1934. The brothers’ union would fracture just over a year later with both brothers separately leading a couple of the most successful big bands of the era. Between the Dorsey Brothers and their individual bands they were responsible for 29 #1 singles! Not to mention other chart toppers that they played on individually or together. This recording also introduces a couple famous names to the number 1 spot. The vocalist is Bob Crosby, Bing’s younger brother. Bob was primarily a singer, but ended up leading his own band during the big band/swing era. We will hear from him again. Also, one of the trombone players (and the arranger of this recording) was Glenn Miller. You know we’re going to hear from him again. So let the Dorsey era begin…. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pg_kluJcDpU
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
I saw that. Her #1 "Angie Baby" is fantastic and one of the reasons 1974 is not the worst year in music.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Gotta give credit where credit is due.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
Tom in the formerly adjacent cube says he isn't crazy for it, but likes it overall. Gives a 7.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
"Along Comes a Woman" seemed cheezy to me in 1984/5, but it has held up very well. And the song grabs you right out of the gate. Good one.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
This Rob Mounsey info is why you need to keep this going, Legeis.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones: Madonna’s “Crazy For You”
And Tom in the formerly adjacent cube had to give this one the dreaded N/A as he didn't know it either.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones Bonus Tracks: R.E.M.’s “Supernatural Superserious”
Mark, good on you for your song and story and your donation. I had never heard this song or heard of it. I first heard of REM from a hipster girl in my 8th grade English class who wore their shirt (1983-ish). The first song I heard by them was "Can't Get There from Here" at the first real high school party I ever went to on New Years Eve 1985 into 86. I never heard the song again until about 5 years ago in a JCPenneys. I recognized it immediately. I guess that's saying something. REM's jangly alternative pop never appealed to me much. They are so creative that I have no doubt there are a few gems in their catalog that I would enjoy. "Stand" is perfectly digestable and "Everybody Hurts" is touching and well done. But for every song like that I think there are probably 12 that just totally make no connection with me. That's fine. And I am not saying you are stupid or wrong if you like it, but I will just make a note (as I have before) that "Losing My Religion" is one of my all time least favorite songs. It represents a boring, hook-less, minor-key guitar strumming, folk music that goes beyond ignorable into unconciously reflexive grimmace face and groaning. BUT--I say that just to say thats how I feel. You are allowed to love it, and that's ok. I still like you. And I still have respect for REM. Today's song is acceptable rock. Doesn't leave a strong impression with me. But I'm happy for Mark being able to bring such a significant song for him to everyone's attention. And "Roam" is SUCH a 10/10.
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September 30, 2020 on The Number Ones Bonus Tracks: R.E.M.’s “Supernatural Superserious”