madgeniusblog

madgeniusblog

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That’s right. But more importantly, it was brought on by a general dissatisfaction with the voices they were presented with on the radio. Think about the ballads from the 80s. Phil Collins ain’t sexy. Johnny Hates Jazz lacks testosterone. The Hungry Housewives wanted a voice with balls and Bolton busted his to give it to them.
Crazy thought, remove their instrumental context and I don't hear that much of a difference between Michael Bolton and Eddie Vedder. I'm not suggesting one opened the door for the other, but I wonder if there was a quiet craving for deeper baritones after a decade where male voices in the rock idiom grew higher and higher. Angst Gen X teens and slightly older housewives certainly were not listening to the same music, but maybe their attention to vocals was drawn to the same foundational starting blocks in their chosen radio formats?
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=NEYc8ar2Bpw
Anyone want to compare this case to the Houses of the Holy kids. There’s something here. Not sure it’s worth $450,000. “There’s something about it though that is disturbing and haunting, perhaps more so because I am in it.” - Stefan Gates https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00w227m
Can we all agree how iconic Alice looks in this video? The doorway, the chair, the cane. The misogyny has aged poorly, but the great Nigel Dick ("Welcome To The Jungle," "Wonderwall," "...Baby One More Time") makes Alice Cooper look like a hard rock prince.
It’s unfortunate he never gets credit for it, but “Hazard” is absolutely Marx’s songwriting and recording masterpiece. It creates a mood unlike anything else he’s done. I love the story about Marx writing to Nebraska’s Chamber of Commerce asking for the names of suitable Nebraska towns for this tale. Hazard must of not minded, they invited Marx to grand marshall their own parade a year later. As for Marx, he apparently thinks the song is “stupid.” Richard Marx has poor judgement on his own material.
The Doves album was gorgeous. Some acts have a hard time coming back in middle age. For them, sonically, it made sense.
You know, compare the sampling and medley madness of Jive Bunny to Prince's effort. There's a bar that the Mastermixers couldn't cross. Meanwhile, Prince raised it.
Yup, and I'm not surprised at Prince's appropriation of the groove and bass tone (and what a sound it is!) in "Batdance." Number one's don't always have to be about melody or even chord progression. Sometimes it's about listening to where sounds are at the moment and pushing just a little further into something so novel that no one's heard it before. It's Prince's "Pump Up The Volume" and it's aged just as well.
The Outfield missed an opportunity with that album, 1989's Voices of Babylon. The title track had this unusual mix of pop rock with underground flavor, echoes of U2 and more gothic, monolithic feeling. Imagine if the whole album went in that direction. We'd might be talking about them like we do The Las. A completely accessible act with record collector credibility. Instead, they released "My Paradise" as a single and sealed themselves permanently into a 1989 time capsule. Good band though.
I'm going to argue for this track as a successful piece of music. Prince pulled something out of the air in 1989 and adapted it to his own funky needs, no surprise. Consider what what happening in hip hop and house music in 1989. The Timelords had just become The KLF and were unleashing their sample-heavy house trilogy, not miles away from what Prince was trying to do here. De La Soul's "3 Feet High and Rising" was merging rap production sensibilities to bebop and funk. Over in jazz, Miles Davis was communicating Minneapolis vibes back in Prince's direction and he certainly would have noticed. Listen to the riff on "Burn" and tell me if Prince didn't try to do the same groove, audaciously replacing Miles with Michael Keaton samples and his own blistering solo. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4X3rAg6lhY In content, I also sense that Prince understood the kids better than just about anyone on the charts at that time. The position the samples occupy in this dizzying mix lend them a mysterious quality to younger ears. Thumbing his nose at the square pearl-clutchers, he opens the song with a sample that sure sounded to my 13-year-old self as "Get the f**ker, Batman!" And the middle section just oozes sex. This song annoyed parents and old school Adam West watchers. And we, the kids at my private school, were thrilled. So this is more than just a collage, it's a hybrid, a medley, it's incorporating the zeitgeist. It's goes a little farther than Tom suggests.
My second was the f**king BoDeans at a county fair. No really. This is not right. It got better. Gig three was Faith No More touring Album Of The Year. Limp Bizkit opened and were roundly booed by the FNM faithful. My other memory of the that show was the soundguy playing a then-unreleased Deftones album before the headlining set.
My first show was, uh, a decade-past-prime Foreigner in 1994. Touring for Mr. Moonlight, an album nobody remembers. Weidner Center, Green Bay, Wisconsin. How are all these kids getting to cool gigs for their first concert?
We live in an era where “take everything that was popular in 2019, throw it in a blender, hope it sticks” is now celebrated as “post-everything pop.” Heaven help us.
Saw them open for Doves in Chicago, summer of 2001. Doves blew them off the stage. When the album arrived, it was OK, but it wasn’t “Lost Souls,” the true revelation for me that year.
Why is it that, for the majority of covers, modernizing a pop classic involves slowing it down? If the tempo remains this grave throughout Olsen's album, it's going to be a slog of a listen.
I would suggest everyone go stream "The Raw and The Cooked." It's a fine album that's aged pretty well for the most part. The band covers a lot of ground, R&B to weird rock hybrids to jangle pop. And Gift sings all of it well. Great band, wish they'd reunite and surprise us all.
Much respect for placing Heart so high. Those '80s hits are finally starting to get their due as Heart classics. I might have placed "These Dreams" that high, but there you go.
OK, silly question, but does anyone know who's miming to the track in the music video? Because the drummer sure does seem like a young Zack Alford (B-52s, Bruce Springsteen, David Bowie). I'm probably wrong though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SOryJvTAGs
Forget Nirvana, this was the band that introduced me, and many other rural American brats, to "Alternative Music." Nirvana was great, but nowhere near a life-changing as Faith No More.
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