mt58

Comments from mt58

Did they ever. Opened and closed the album with a heartbeat. It would make it cooler story if it was actually someone’s heartbeat that they recorded, but, alas, it’s just a bass kickdrum. Either way, a great concept to open and close with.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
A land of hopes and dreams, indeed.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
If you might please shoehorn in John Wetton, then my day will be complete.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
I’d have done my usual dopey exponential notation, but I’m on mobile today. The thumbtappy keyboard does not want to play along.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
We wouldn’t have it any other way, leoprine buddy. Your time is nigh. Bring it on.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Once upon a time Once when you were mine I remember skies Reflected in your eyes I wonder where you are I wonder if you think about me Once upon a time In your wildest dreams I mean, just wow. That puts me away every time.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
The Curly Shuffle. Ha. And they said that in ‘84, the novelty record was a relic of the past. Numbskulls.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
And, suddenly, I absolutely have to see this. Please tell me you’ll shoot some cell phone video when it does.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Whenever Yes came to town, I’d always look the next day for the Boston Globe rock critic’s review of the show. He would always, and I mean, every time, cite: “...the elfin voice of Jon Anderson.”
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Alexa and Siri have been notified. Reminders: set.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Beautiful, v-dog. 5:19 is indeed the moment that this one goes from impulse power to warp drive.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Take heart, Barnable. We still love ya. Just think; Someone out there reading this has to contend with a BDNO of “My Ding-A-Ling.” The poor soul.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
I was so hoping that our resident expert progressive rock commenter would be here today. Great post and great to hear from you, bornslippy.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
A perfect example of what I was aiming to describe. Thank you, LTS.
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
I was a huge Yes fan from way before 1984. They had me at “Close To The Edge.” No doubt whatsoever that today’s Number One is a huge shift from their earlier progressive work. But a sellout? My take is a little different. If you had to name one thing that long-running, successful artists do, reinvention would be near the top of the list. A great non-musical example is Steve Martin. He achieved superstar status wearing an arrow through his head, and using an oddball, “Excuuuuse ME” catch-phrase. And then, he started to try and evolve. He had the courage and confidence to keep moving, whether or not the new project was a hit or flop. There are dozens of examples that more alert minds here will cite. I could start with the Doobie Brothers, Bowie, and the Beatles for openers. Whether the attempt works or is a total bust, it’s always interesting to see a band take a shot and leave a certain comfort zone. And a last thought: I’m sure it’s just a symptom of me getting older, but I kind of like it when you see an artist with semi-moderate success finally hit a grand slam. Contrary to popular belief, a lot of musicians don’t end up very well financially. In my imagination, I’m thinking of those who are past their prime, looking at the charts, and saying, “My God... we did it. It was all worth it. We’re not going to die in poverty.”
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August 5, 2020 on The Number Ones: Yes’ “Owner Of A Lonely Heart”
Ringo was always the comic relief. He sort of gets a pass. As long as he’s not singing, “ ... I’d like to be, in a London pizzeria, with you...”
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
Love it. Loved it when the Stones got political.
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
A rough time, cruelly compounded by current events. Thinking good thoughts for you and the family. The EMT was right: Good job. Hang tough, friend Shocker.
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
"The Beatles position is that they don’t sing jingles to peddle sneakers, beer, pantyhose or anything else." While their actual legal representation could have been from anywhere, you have to agree that the above quote is a delicious example of the perfect flair for factual understatement, that only the British can do. Reason # 461 to love the UK.
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
[Best read as imagined in your particular area's generic, back-country accent:] "Well, maybe so, young feller, Link... but I hear tell in these parts, some folks say," "... it's a 6."
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
I found comfort in my nerdier self for a while. [As hundreds are reading and nodding along.]
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
Good Monday to you all. (Please hang in there with me. Attempting to put an actual cogent thought together, after another just-perfect night’s sleep. /sarcasm) I use to roll my eyes at the people who would call in to sports talk radio and get really loud, emotional and angry when defending their team or a player. Really, (mostly) guys? It’s just a game. Your mortgage payment isn’t going to change. And then one day, I realized that I was cut from exactly the same cloth, just maybe a different pattern of plaid. I found that both my voice and blood pressure were incrementally rising as I was trying to defend-splain Paul McCartney’s contributions to pop culture in general, and in particular, in today’s Number One. Music, exactly like sports and politics, engenders passion in those who will let it take control. That was the moment that I knew that I’d never make it as a lawyer. I let the guy on the other side of the bar get to me. No amount of chart stats, logic, or brilliant lyric and hook recitation was going to give me any edge. Steadfast Derek, wherever he is today, likely still maintains that Macca = overhype; that the kid from Liverpool was, is, and ever shall be, overrated. I didn’t know you all back then, but I apologize for failing you. I’ll do better. A virtual round is on me. I can’t pin the name of a certain concept. Sharper and more caffeinated minds here might help me come up with what it’s called. Maybe it’s ‘’contrarian”? You notice it when there’s a discussion of someone who has an impossibly deep CV, and because of the breadth and quality of that work, they have achieved a larger-than-life status. There’s an odd reflexive backlash that some folks have, a sort of a duty and obligation to criticize and find something, anything, wrong with the picture. For some reason, all objectivity goes out the window. The takedown itself becomes their primary mission. And that’s why I appreciated our host’s respectful and, I thought, rather poignant nod to McCartney. First: It was measured, fair and equitable, the gold standard for critical review about… um, well, anything in life, I guess. He is right: you can never say ‘never.’ But if “Say, Say, Say” is indeed his Number Ones swan-ish song, Tom did the right thing today. It was a nice way to start the week. May intelligent and reasonable minds always prevail. Atta writer. And second: for some reason, I feel a just a little bit better about Derek. I’m sending a big virtual smirk his way. So there. (I know. Not very lawyerly. Told ya. I’ll work on it.)
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
Well remembered. I bought it in error when trying to find the "real" "AEIOU" record, which was actually the Freeez recording. The "syllabic solo" (credited as such!) at about 6:39 was created by sampling a spoken "A," "E," "I," "O," and "U," and then having the keyboard assign a full range of notes as if each was a separate instrument. Now you could probably do this with a free app on your phone, but in it's day, it was a remarkable and well-executed idea. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbTv8EBQqAE
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August 3, 2020 on The Number Ones: Paul McCartney & Michael Jackson’s “Say Say Say”
A note to friends RJ, Shocker, BG, Link, Mr. Plow, and everyone else that graces us with extraneous content: In my opinion, it's anything but drivel, digressive, meandering, moldy, or rambling. On the contrary, it's all well-planned, edutaining information and a lot of fun. It's all perfectly within in the purview of what this comment section has become. Thank you for what you do. We're lucky that you take the time to write, and share your talent and passion.
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August 2, 2020 on The Number Ones: Lionel Richie’s “All Night Long (All Night)”
Many of the artists on your list have cited the Beatles as a primary influence. So, maybe Sgt.Pepper would make for a logical ground zero.
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July 31, 2020 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
Wishing you good luck with the new meds, LJ.
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July 31, 2020 on Shut Up, Dude: This Week’s Best And Worst Comments
Indeed, LTC. Required reading in the wee small hours of the morning.
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July 31, 2020 on The Number Ones: Lionel Richie’s “All Night Long (All Night)”
Re: "Just Got Lucky:" Goes to show that you indeed can make a killer hook with just two well-executed pairs of notes: "Dum, dum.... DUM, dum...." I'm feelin' jake. This is a great record.
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July 31, 2020 on The Number Ones: Lionel Richie’s “All Night Long (All Night)”