PersonaAuGratin

PersonaAuGratin

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sorry, read that again and they said late 2019. nevermind
Pang came out this year? God, 2020 has been long.
For anyone that's been following Tom's "Number Ones" Column, we know clearly that talent and excellence in your craft are not always tied to with success and recognition. All these recent comments by pop stars questioning this years Grammy's makes me wonder: How long have the been watching the Grammy's? Are Christopher Cross' Self titled (1981), Toto: Toto IV (1983), Eric Clapton: Unplugged (1993), and Steely Dan: Two Against Nature (2001) really the best albums music had to offer those years? That said there absolutely is a kernel of truth surrounding the petulance and narcissism in some of these overly dramatic artist responses to the Grammy's this year. Yes, the methodology of the way a lot of these awards are handed out is unknown. Sales are never, and should never, be the sole driver of assessing what "good art" is. The music industry still has not figured out it's relevance in a time where people's consumption is broader and more niche then ever before and an artist can get massive attention just by putting a mixtape on Soundcloud on their own, making major labels more meaningless and impotent than ever. I'm not sure I even really know what earning a Grammy "means" anymore in the age of streaming. People have mentioned before that a Grammy still does have relevance to a certain type of music consumer, but it's always meant more to the artists and the industry. So, of course as music fans (particularly the more passionate or cynical), we'd say, "Who gives a _____ about these awards. Go enjoy your fame and money." But, it obviously means something to these artists, especially since money and fame can disappear in a blink. Just ask 1991 Grammy award nominee MC Hammer. Awards may have lost some cache' but they still stay in the record books. And one day someone might be writing a wildly successful column about everyone who one a Grammy since it's inception. So, I guess I just think it should still matter how we reward and elevate art and artists. Artists, labels, industry professionals, and fans should have a discussion on the best way to do that. And maybe the Grammy, despite it's long history, is no longer the right way to do it. But to say, "none of this matters", doesn't take into account the overwhelming deluge of "Best of ..." lists and Spotify playlist rankings being published right now that we all love to read and consume.
"Maybe I’m just not listening on sufficiently expensive equipment, but this thing bores the shit out of me." One of my favorite quotes in the history of this column. Also, the title of the Steely Dan book I'm going to eventually write.
Well, as Tom Scharpling is fond of saying, "That's why god invented horse racing." I'm hard pressed to think of anyone under the age of 40 listening to this song for any reason other than irony. I feel like when people thinking of the 80's as being a bad genre of music, it's because of songs like this. It's so shiny, manufactured, and soulless...well, there's a reason you see songs like this mostly showing up in comedies.
I was gonna say leave the poor guy alone, but that "UPS Batman" joke was really funny.
My Father, My King is definitive Mogwai.
You definitely nailed the right Cure album. I think I'd agree that "Playing the Angel" is the more appropriate Depeche Mode album for this exercise. Exciter was kind of a slog, but it sounded like they were trying to make a Bjork album, not a Depeche Mode album. "Angel" was the start of them telling the fans that "this one is going back to the 'Violater' inspiration".
So, is everyone just writing their own column with Tom's column now?
I mean, the guy did pick half of Les Savy Fav to be his house band. I'd say his indie punk cred is pretty bonafide.
"I Know There's Something Going On" absolutely rules.
I was gonna make a similar joke but, I knew by this time someone had to have done it already.
They aren't the worst, but Steely Dan do absolutely suck. The rehabilitation of this band is unjustified and I think it's basically just because John Mulaney likes them.
I'm with you on all of this but would sub out "Hall and Oats" for "Total Eclipse of the Heart", which received a mindbogglingly large amount of love from this comments section
the best SP songs are the ones where you don't really notice the lyrics. He can pull off a good phrase now and then that sounds good with the music, but, yeah, there's some rough stuff, especially on Mellon Collie. New Order is very similar.
This looks cool, but I'm sure it'll be a million dollars and it's hard in this economy to spend that much on a record I already own. I'd buy the DVD's if they sold them separately, though!
I was in sixth grade in 1992. We had an art teacher that let us bring in our own music to listen to in class on Friday's. It was my turn and one of the band's I was really into at the time was 90125-era Yes. I brought that CD in thinking it was the coolest because, as Tom says, "owner of a lonely hear" rules (I also dug Changes and Leave It, that latter of which I still love because of it's catchy yet extremely silly keyboard line in the chorus). I proceed to get mercilessly teased about how much it sucked and eventually the teacher put me out of my misery and another kid put on Metallica's Black Album. You would think I would have had the self awareness at 11 to know that most people would not have thought Yes was cool in 1992, especially after Nirvana broke. But no, 11 year olds are stupid. SO GIVE ME BREAK! I do think it's funny that Yes' "sell-out" record got boo'd off for Metallica's clearly calculated sell-out record and, if it was 2002 and that got brought in Metallica, they would have been the one getting torn apart. Such is life!
I'd argue Billy Joel has not ascended again, at least with anyone under 35.
The far bigger problem with this record is Hetfield's terrible lyrics and singing that's far too high in the mix. There's stuff on here that makes Bernard Sumner sound like Ernest Hemingway. It just sounds like he's recording vocals for another album. They're just too clean for a record this cheap sounding. The snare is not my favorite, but it works for some songs. I think it just get exhausting being the sound for a whole record. But it does kind of work considering how thrashy a record it is. I definitely remember thinking this sounded like the worst thing I had ever heard when it first came out. I've weirdly warmed up to it over time.
Exactly! Ed Droste founded the Hooter's Restaurant chain and now he wants to be paid a bunch of money to play music? The gall, sir. The GALL!