Hidden Fees On Concert Tickets Will Be Banned Under New York Bill

Brad Barket/Getty Images

Hidden Fees On Concert Tickets Will Be Banned Under New York Bill

Brad Barket/Getty Images

New legislation in New York State will require ticketing companies to show “all-in” ticket prices that show all inclusive and ancillary fees up front. That means that the final ticket cost — on both primary and resale sellers — must be disclosed on the ticket’s initial listing, as opposed to many pages later in the buying process. As of June 3, the bill has passed the state senate and the assembly and is awaiting Governor Kathy Hochul’s signature.

“I agree with the statement that people should pay, and will pay, whatever they want to pay for a ticket,” Senate Investigations and Government Operations Committee chair James Skoufis tells Billboard. “But they should know what that is. Oftentimes, they’re not told what that value is.” In addition to including the final ticket price “in a clear and conspicuous manner,” the seller cannot mislead the consumer by displaying the total fee in a smaller type size.

Ticketmaster released a statement to Billboard commending the move, with managing director Marla Ostroff saying, “We are supportive of industry-wide reforms and believe even more can be done to aid artists in delivering tickets to fans at their set price points. We would like to thank Assemblymember O’Donnell, in particular, for his work and steadfast support of the New York entertainment community.”

The original bill has been scaled back somewhat; when it was first introduced in 2021, there were measures including easier ways for consumers to get refunds for events delayed (but not necessarily canceled) due to COVID-19. The bill also originally had a measure targeting “holdbacks,” aka tickets reserved for insiders and not available to the general public. (Skoufis cited a 2012 Justin Bieber show at Madison Square Garden where 28% of tickets were held back for things like friends, pre-sales, VIP packages, and credit card partners.)

Hochul will need to sign the bill before the existing law expires on July 1.

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