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Cerebus
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 +1Posted on Oct 31st | re: MTV Unplugged In New York Turns 20 (35 comments)

‘In The Fade’ is my favorite QOTSA song.

Vedder is my favorite for longevity – he still sounds like himself. Cornell used to be my favorite, but dude just isn’t the same. I love AIC best when Stayley and Cantrell are doing stuff together, but who knows what they would have done if Layne were still around. I might feel differently about that if they done a bit more. I do love Layne’s voice, though. Loved Kurt’s too, of all of them his might be the most vulnerable. Lanegan, who I love, sounds slightly different to me at various points throughout his career. His voice keeps changing as he ages (and smokes more cigarettes).

 0Posted on Oct 31st | re: MTV Unplugged In New York Turns 20 (35 comments)

Layne is so clearly high out of his mind for that Alice In Chains Unplugged that I can’t watch it at all. I mean he’s almost nodding during some songs.

Silly me, I was just rolling with the tone presented by the Stereogum article. I should have known better and checked out the video myself.

I don’t care what anybody thinks about Billy Corgan or Anderson Cooper, nor do I care what they think about each other. What I do care about is what the hell was Cooper thinking, speaking poorly of any kind of animal rescue/placement work?

 -2Posted on Oct 31st | re: The Black Market: The Month In Metal - October 2014 (13 comments)

They were never of the genre in which Stereogum wishes to place them (the first album by them anybody knows wasn’t even released until 1999). They’re a product of their fucked up environment. Their sound is their own and it continues to be far more metal than any of the other artists one could easily lump together as “nu metal”. Further, while those bands softened and tried new sounds, Slipknot went harder and uglier. Iowa is one of the darkest albums I’ve ever listened to. It still makes me feel like I need to take a shower. They took that same path with this new album. Like, I don’t get it. Is it because they’re too “popular”? Maybe because they actually know how to write catchy, melodic songs that are still hard as fuck? Because they got radio airplay on occasion? Doesn’t anybody have the understanding that all that only helps metal in general and should be supported and celebrated to the fullest? Lastly, “nobody likes them”? So you’re saying all the stuff that is written about at Stereogum is done on the basis of whether or not somebody on staff likes them? If that’s true about all the crap you guys have covered lately it’s enough to make me reconsider this website being a place I need to regularly visit.

 -3Posted on Oct 31st | re: The Black Market: The Month In Metal - October 2014 (13 comments)

Not a single mention of the new Slipknot album. Why? Stereogum confuses me lately.

 +3Posted on Oct 31st | re: MTV Unplugged In New York Turns 20 (35 comments)

Where Did You Sleep Last Night is one of the single greatest live performances I’ve ever seen or heard, and I’ve seen and heard a lot. The rest of the show teeters between great and enjoyable for me. It’s still a great listen, but I often skip a number of tracks when I listen to it these days. I don’t think it would be nearly as mythic if Kurt and Nirvana had stuck around and produced more material.

 +1Posted on Oct 31st | re: MTV Unplugged In New York Turns 20 (35 comments)

Wouldn’t be Stereogum in 2014 if y’all passed by a chance to get in a dig at Dave Grohl.

Slipknot is an incredibly popular band who became so, and stayed that way, by doing whatever the fuck they wanted, exactly the way they wanted, when they wanted to do it. The drivel being spewed in this “article” is just complete nonsense.

Lazy and pretentious writing based on opinion, not fact. Exactly the kind of bullshit herd thinking Slipknot has always been against.