Chipotle

Comments from Chipotle

The whole reaction to this album is so overblown. The critical knives have been out for them since Reflektor, and yes the rollout was tedious at times, but the album is still really good and not worth the level of vitriol that's been directed at it. Also, the "rock band at a time when festival-headlining rock bands are becoming an endangered species" line is really tired and is a boring cliché at this point. Every single review I read of a rock act, I now expect some kind of line like that.
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July 26, 2017 on Premature Evaluation: Arcade Fire Everything Now
I don't think it's true that Linkin Park is/will be the last popular rock band in America. Haven't Imagine Dragons and Twenty One Pilots logged multiple top ten hits and gone multiplatinum? They occupy a very similar sonic and cultural space to Linkin Park anyway. I also think it's a cop out to try to rehabilitate nu metal and pop punk (which is better) by just saying "millenials have different taste we shouldn't judge." Lots of millennials love The Strokes and remember Linkin Park is an embarrassing phase they went through in middle school.
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July 21, 2017 on Against All Odds, Linkin Park Were America’s Last Huge Rock Band
I think the revisionism one the next wave of popular rock bands (Mumford, Foster the People, Fun., Lumineers) will be easier since those bands don't have the aggro baggage that nu metal had. It's the same reason it's a lot easier to reappraise Blink-182, who after all, were a product of punk and post-punk music, than Creed. That said, poptimism really has invited this cycle where *everything* is reappraised as post-ironically good. The only stuff that seems to be exempt from the reappraisal is stuff by artists who scan as too male or too white like The Chainsmokers.
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July 21, 2017 on Against All Odds, Linkin Park Were America’s Last Huge Rock Band
Yeah same here. I've never liked them, even as a kid, but as a musician, I think you just feel a loss, especially when I think about all my musician friends who have dealt with mental health issues.
+5 |
July 20, 2017 on Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington Dead At 41
Interesting how they're highlighting their more "classic rock" side with heavy emphasis on Ok Computer and In Rainbows alongside AMSP, not nearly as much from Kid A. Seems like that's been a constant throughout this tour, whereas TKOL tour was much heavier on glitchier stuff and obscurities.
+6 |
July 19, 2017 on Radiohead’s Controversial Israel Show Finally Happened, And It Was Their Longest Set In 11 Years
That's really disappointing. Nick Valensi had seemed to suggest they had a new album coming out this year. It's a damn shame if one doesn't come out because I think there's real pent up demand for a full LP and waiting too much longer would probably just frustrate people.
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May 22, 2017 on Julian Casablancas+The Voidz Guitarist Confirms Second Album
Yeah this album is great and not at all disappointing. It also has The Strokes all over it which I can't help but love. Would love if Julian and the boys put out something this consistent.
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May 19, 2017 on Soft Times: On Paramore’s Surprising Retro Reboot
I hear Angles/Comedown Machine era Strokes all over this thing too. Great stuff.
+3 |
May 12, 2017 on Stream Paramore After Laughter
I hear the Strokes more than anything else.
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April 19, 2017 on Paramore – “Hard Times” Video
Honestly the Chainsmokers are more a really bad indie pop/rock act at this point than an EDM one.
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April 18, 2017 on You Can Blame These Artists For Influencing The Chainsmokers
I assume by "strange piece of music" she means "Green Light is not a very good song."
+3 |
April 12, 2017 on Lorde Reveals Max Martin’s Criticism Of “Green Light,” Implies Melodrama Is A Concept Album About A House Party
I still remember the excitement of hearing 50s rock and roll when I was a kid at my grandmother's house. RIP Chuck. The Great Twenty Eight remains his definitive compilation.
+8 |
March 18, 2017 on R.I.P. Chuck Berry
Agreed, and Ryan does them better than anyone.
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March 4, 2017 on Pop Turns 20
Agreed. As a songwriter, he's very easy to study because his methods are so clear, but it's no less impressive to listen to. In a way, it's more helpful writing your own songs because you can understand it more easily and apply the techniques (imperfectly) to your own work. The downside to that is so much pop sounds like him and his school of producers. He says in the interview we're out of the "EDM swamp," but pop radio still has a very limited sound palette, partially because he is just so successful.
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February 28, 2017 on Max Martin Discusses Prince, Taylor Swift, And Pharrell In Rare Interview
Agreed. I think pop culture suffers from a lack of good pop/rock bands that make good middle of the road guitar-driven music. Early Maroon 5 songs hold up in a way their later work certainly will not. You could say the same thing about Coldplay.
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February 14, 2017 on Maroon 5 – “Cold” (Feat. Future)
Yup. Stooges/Stones/Faces/Led Zeppelin/Velvet Underground influence would be welcome and would sound super fresh.
+12 |
February 10, 2017 on Dirty Projectors, Fleet Foxes Frontmen Discuss The “Both Bad And Boujee” State Of Indie Rock Today
Also call me crazy, but I think 2017 will be a really good year for (indie) rock music. 2016 was dominated by great superstar R&B/hip-hop albums, so I think the time is more than ripe for a shift.
+10 |
February 10, 2017 on Dirty Projectors, Fleet Foxes Frontmen Discuss The “Both Bad And Boujee” State Of Indie Rock Today
It's ok. The verses and message are nice, but it mostly feels like Max Martin by the numbers.
0 |
February 10, 2017 on Katy Perry – “Chained To The Rhythm”
Indie rock has been criticized as refined and effete for as long as I can remember, but I think a narrow focus on a certain strand of American indie rock masks how bands like Tame Impala and Unknown Mortal Orchestra really are pushing music forward while influencing artists across genre lines. I think 2016 was an unusually weak year for indie rock, but 2015 and 2013 had lots of great stuff. But yes, you can't keep mining 90s lo-fi indie rock/Pavement forever and expect it to sound fresh.
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February 10, 2017 on Dirty Projectors, Fleet Foxes Frontmen Discuss The “Both Bad And Boujee” State Of Indie Rock Today
The performative hate for the Chainsmokers is just grating at this point. We get it, they are "bros" who don't fit the mold of the intersectional pop star. Their music is no more offensive or inoffensive than anyone else that This Week In Pop covers. Time to move on.
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January 30, 2017 on Chainsmokers’ Debut Album Is Coming
Really cool Radiohead is giving the South some attention. Always nice to see when they make moves to take care of their fans like that.
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January 17, 2017 on Radiohead Announce 2017 US Tour Dates
I realize that, but I think electric guitars are bound to re-enter the mainstream in the next few years, either with their imitators or through another vehicle (maybe even the follow up LP).
+2 |
January 5, 2017 on The 2017 State Of Pop Address
Agreed about a resurgence of rock in some form. Weird to read so many "rock is dead" thinkpieces this year when soft rock has already made a comeback and Twenty One Pilots seem bound to inspire imitators. Electric guitar is just to embedded in pop culture to disappear.
+4 |
January 5, 2017 on The 2017 State Of Pop Address
Agreed. Mumford and Sons (whether you like them or hate them) is the biggest rock band to emerge this decade, not the modern equivalent of The Squirrel Nut Zippers.
+3 |
December 29, 2016 on The Year The Mainstream Discovered Tame Impala
Maybe I'm getting soft, but I'm softening up on a lot of that stuff. I listened to a John Mayer album (Continuum) the other day and thought it was okay. I blame Ryan for that too.
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December 29, 2016 on The Year The Mainstream Discovered Tame Impala
That's a great point, but it's hard to know how much of this is a lasting change and how much of it is current trends. Joanne took a stab at moving pop back towards "real" instrumentation but the songs weren't good enough to spearhead a change away from synthpop and trap. That said, it's hard to believe more prominently mixed guitars won't come back at least moderately. There were just so many awful brick-walled guitars in the 2000s that people (rightly) burned out on them. I think about the 1980s: synths and huge drum machines were all over most pop productions, but by the 90s, Nirvana marked the definitive beginning of a switch back towards more guitar-driven pop songs, which had been foreshadowed in Tracy Chapman's "Fast Car" and George Michael's "Faith," among other late 80s songs. I'm not saying EDM and especially hip hop are going anywhere, but I think a lot of the vocal sampling and other production techniques in vogue now will sound really dated in a few years. Listening to a 2011 dubstep-era pop hit is already brutal, whereas something like "Pumped Up Kicks" or "Somebody That I Used To Know, exceptions to the trend at the time, sound just fine. I'm not a massive fan myself, but Adele's massive sales are an indication the public hasn't forgotten how to respond to that sort of thing.
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December 29, 2016 on The Year The Mainstream Discovered Tame Impala
Ryan, thanks for writing about what I agree is a special band. Currents is a great one-album rebuttal to the tired "rock is dead" canard. I do have to disagree with a few points though. 1) It's just not true that there are no big rock bands in the mainstream anymore or even on pop radio. The majority of the Stereogum audience may be indifferent to hostile towards them, but X Ambassadors, Imagine Dragons, The Lumineers, Coldplay, Twenty One Pilots, The 1975, Panic at the Disco, Walk the Moon, and 5 Seconds of Summer all sell out stadiums or at least large amphitheaters. They aren't my idea of great artists, but they are commercially successful. 2) What makes Tame Impala exciting is not that they show a rock band can be popular, but that a *good* (read: cool and critically acclaimed, from the indie/alternative rock world) rock band can be popular. They also seem to reconcile the (also tired) rockism vs. poptimism debate. Kevin Parker can quote Cream and Can even as Rihanna covers him. 3) That said, the other trend this year a lot of critics have missed out on is that this is also a false dichotomy. The biggest pop albums of the year (Anti, Made in the AM, Starboy, Suicide Squad Soundtrack, especially Joanne and Blonde) are awash in "rockist" gestures, including featuring Mr. Rockism himself, Jack White, on Lemonade. Even Ariana Grande released a single driven by electric guitars. The critical establishment (not you, Ryan, you get this stuff) may have written off rock as a tired genre, but artists themselves (including the biggest pop stars) have not. 3) As much as I love Tame Impala, they aren't quite as big as they feel like they should be, and that may take one more album or huge collaboration. I think this stems from the red vs. blue state bubble (not to mention the class bubble) that has gotten a lot of attention lately. Spotify says Imagine Dragons are the 35th most streamed artist in the world right now,(whereas Tame Impala is only the 500th), but I don't know anyone who listens to them. Something to keep in mind. Cheers for great writing as always.
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December 29, 2016 on The Year The Mainstream Discovered Tame Impala
Somebody's been listening to Flume's "Never Be Like You" and the new Bon Iver. Pretty bland and not what I was hoping for after 1989.
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December 9, 2016 on ZAYN & Taylor Swift – “I Don’t Wanna Live Forever (Fifty Shades Darker)”
It makes sense I guess if you listen to the folk rock original version, which I imagine the Grammys liked. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41GZVVcxQps
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December 6, 2016 on Here Are The 2017 Grammys Nominations