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ethicalfan
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 +1Posted on Nov 22nd, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

It doesn’t matter whether they think of it as stealing. Seeding or leaching copyrighted material without permission is a violation of US Federal law (17 USC 106) and of the basic human rights of the content creator. Article 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights says “Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.”

 +1Posted on Nov 22nd, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

The only thing needed to make the market for music start working properly on the internet is for ISPs to follow the law 17 USC 512 (i) and terminate repeat infringers. They know they have to. That is why they are doing CCI to try and throw contnet a bone so they dont get sued for not implementing this law. Verizon’s acceptable use policy warns you that you could be terminated for repeatedly infirnging copyright. They just don’t do it. If they followed the law, 42% of all US internet traffic would not be used to illegally consume music, movies, software, video games and ebooks. Music rand Home Video revenue would actually go up like ISPs revenues and Google’s revenues. That is how the DMCA was designed to work. Most ISPs just ignore the law. Musician’s incomes would start increasing and over time people would value music again. That is what copyright does, establishes a value for copyrights.

 0Posted on Nov 22nd, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

Blocking pirate websites causes no more civil liberties issues than blocking IP addresses that send spam which all major internet companies and ISPs work together through spamhaus to do everyday with tens of thousands of ip addresses. Pro-piracy businesses just hate the idea that they might actually have to pay part of their massive profits to the people who made the media they leverage. This is the biggest red herring in our lifetime. Google blacked out their logo in February because they own 60% of the ad networks that push ads to BILLIONS of landing pages that have links to illegal free content. The ISPs contribute to this canard because their broadband business grows 10% a year on the backs of illegal free media while all those content industries collapse. Also notice the other hypocrisy that no one says “an IP address is not an individual” when it comes to spam enforcement.

 0Posted on Nov 22nd, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

Music has been devalued by the ISPs who facilitate the zone of anonymity which makes it economically impossible for content creators to enforce copyrights on the internet. This combined with the fact that the majority of the $400B telecom industry ignores 17 USC 512 (i) and doesn’t terminate repeat infringers is what has devalued music. It is simply amazing that so many people and powerful corporations are now involved in oppressing a generation of creative workers and depriving them of economic opportunity.

 0Posted on Nov 20th, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

Telling Google that they cannot crawl Pirate Bay is NO different from how all ISPs and major web companies work together with spamhaus to BLOCK ip addresses used for spam. The ONLY reason for this hypocrisy is that GOOGLE (GOOG) makes BILLIONS from the ad networks that they own that push ads to the billions of the landing pages with links to illegal copyrighted media indexed by Pirate Bay, Kick Ass Torrents, Extratorrent, etc.

 +1Posted on Nov 20th, 2012 | re: Deconstructing: Pandora, Spotify, Piracy, And Getting Artists Paid (77 comments)

The market for cultural products such as music, movies, books, video games, TV shows, etc. is never going to work until ISPs start following the law they asked for and terminate service of repeat infringers (BitTorrent Seeders). ISPs are simply flagrantly violating the law 17 USC 512(i) which states that in order to have safe harbor from the liability due to 42% of their upstream traffic being used to illegally distribute music, movies, software, games and books (Sandvine November 2012), they must have a policy for terminating repeat copyright infringers. Why was that law (17 USC 512 (i)) put in place in 1998? Because ISPs asked the US congress to give them a way to have a safe harbor from the copyright infringements occurring on their networks. The US congress did this because prior to the DMCA, it was CRYSTAL clear that ISPs could be sued for their third-party liability to copyright owners when their subscribers illegally distributed copyrighted material on their networks. Senator Feinstein and others believed the ISPs would hold up their end of the bargain. They have not. The ISPs now abuse this law and make tremendous profits at the expensive of every US creative industry. Broadband revenues have explodes to $50B since the DMCA and music, motion picture, console and pc gaming, cable subscriptions all decrease due to the fact that ALL of their products are now available on America’s ISPs illegally for free.