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Tom Breihan
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New York punks Big Ups started off the year by releasing their awesomely raw debut album Eighteen Hours Of Static. They’ll wind it down by dropping a new split EP with the Brooklyn band Washer. The first Big Ups song on the split is a fearsome, erratic pigfuck sludge-monster called “Rash,” and it might be the first Big Ups song that sounds more like the Jesus Lizard than it does like Suicidal Tendencies. Listen to it below.

It’s probably not a surprise that Law & Order: SVU has put together an episode inspired by the famous Jay Z/Solange elevator fight. The ripped-from-the-headlines thing is, after all, what this show does. Right now, some Law & Order writer is probably trying to figure out how to work the Wiz Khalifa/Amber Rose divorce into an episode. But it’s one thing to know it’s coming, and it’s another to see it in action. And below, you can behold a clip of the episode, which apparently also takes inspiration from the Ray Rice and Donald Sterling stories, completing the rare online-feeding-frenzy trifecta. It’s hard to say how the clip will fit into the episode, but it’s definitely an elevator fight, and Stacy Keach is definitely in it. Watch it below.

Aphex Twin may be the visionary who changed dance music and who released one of the year’s best albums. But he is also a socially awkward white man who owns lots of computer equipment. And as such, maybe it’s not a surprise that he “absolutely” believes the 9/11 attacks were an inside job. As Gigwise points out, in new Q interview, Richard D. James copped to agreeing with every online conspiracy theory he comes across, partly because he thinks it makes life more fun: “When you follow stuff on the internet about Illuminati, New World Order, aliens, even if none of it’s true, it’s just a thousand times better than any science fiction film that’s ever been written… I do believe pretty much all of it. You can’t only believe things which can be proven. It’s boring. Loads of things are unproven, but it doesn’t stop you believing in them.” Mark Ruffalo agrees. James of course does not have a reputation for being very truthful in interviews, but this a dumb thing to lie about.

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Breathe easy. Ben Allen isn’t remotely a hip-hop producer. He did, like, the Gnarls Barkley album, which is probably what they’re talking about. He used to mix and engineer rap records, like back in the ’90s. But his recent resume is way more indie rock: Washed Out’s Within and Without, Deerhunter’s Halcyon Digest, a couple Bombay Bicycle Club albums. It’s not like they ran out and got DJ Mustard.

 +4Posted on Sep 24th | re: Mixtape Of The Week: Archibald Slim He's Drunk! (14 comments)

It appears that only I have a magical computer where Soundcloud has a “download all” button. Watch me go mad with power now. Also, nobody will ever love you, arsetothat.

 +22Posted on Sep 23rd | re: Kendrick Lamar - "i" (89 comments)

That has to be Thundercat on the bass, right?

 +4Posted on Sep 19th | re: Laura Jane Grace Slams Ex-Against Me!/New Slipknot Drummer (16 comments)

The drummer’s Daddy, it might be worth mentioning, is Max Weinberg. Also, Jay was really fun to watch onstage, and he totally acted like he was the frontman of the band. SO MUCH stick-twirling.

 +1Posted on Sep 18th | re: DJ Quik - "That Getter" (3 comments)

Great answer. I was thinking possibly Scarface too, but he’s been pretty inactive for the past few years.

 +10Posted on Sep 11th | re: Premature Evaluation: U2 Songs Of Innocence (144 comments)

These are the things that happen when you’re trying to speed-write. Fixed, thank you.

 +78Posted on Aug 29th | re: Riff Raff To Sam Smith: "Your Face Is Super Huge" (50 comments)

You have to adjust for distance. Sam Smith is sitting one mile away from the camera.

 +1Posted on Aug 22nd | re: Dummy Turns 20 (43 comments)

They were great! Early on, anyway! But the idea of grouping them into a hot-new-scene with Portishead was a fundamental misunderstanding of everything all 3 of them were doing, as was the idea that they represented the music of the future.

Yes. This is not up for debate. Nobody has ever cried to Aesop.