News 

If the house-inflected Canadian pop singer Kiesza seems to have jumped on the post-Disclosure bandwagon a little late, consider that her “Hideaway” video — in which Kiesza and her posse pull off an epic one-shot dance routine on the streets of Brooklyn — premiered way back in February. So although “Hideaway” hasn’t been simmering toward success quite as long as “Latch” did, it’s not exactly something new either. Still, here’s what I wrote when I first posted the video last March:

Close your eyes and pretend it’s the new Disclosure single. Or open your eyes and enjoy some fully committed dancing.

Scottish rockers the Twilight Sad are back with another set of sunken-hearted, sky-scraping guitar anthems. Nobody Wants To Be Here And Nobody Wants To Leave, the follow-up to 2012′s No One Can Ever Know, finds the band weaving post-punk and new wave elements into their shoegaze-inflected epics, topped off as always by James Graham’s world-weary vocals. We posted early singles “There’s A Girl In The Corner” and “Last January,” and now you can stream the whole album below. Do it!

For his new single “Bugatti,” the Montreal dance producer Tiga links up with the great Clipse rapper Pusha T. It’s perhaps a bit weird for someone to name a song “Bugatti” so soon after the great Future/Ace Hood/Rick Ross track, but fancy cars can inspire that level of dedication. The song is a clipped seven-minute house track about said car’s ability to impress girls. (We accidentally ran an earlier Pusha-free version, but he’s on this one, we promise.) Listen below.

British electronic wizards Underworld released their seminal record Dubnobasswithmyheadman in 1994, and in celebration of the album’s 20th anniversary, Rick Smith and Karl Hyde participated in a documentary about its creation. The two-part documentary includes performance footage and testimonial interviews, giving some insight into the process of creating Dubnobasswithmyheadman as well as an account of how Underworld translated the album to a live setting. Smith commented that Underworld prepared every bit of technology in advance to make sure it performed to its fullest capability, and that the group did not rehearse before taking the record to the stage. “It was all about the pressure of the moment, and the failing, and the recovery,” he said. Watch below.

Chances are, if you read this site or anything about music on the internet, you heard about Ryn Weaver this summer. Back in June, Weaver appeared, seemingly apropos of nothing, on SoundCloud with “OctaHate,” a song that garnered considerable buzz because A) it’s a really great, infectious song, and B) the murderer’s row of people involved. Charli XCX co-wrote, Benny Blanco and Passion Pit mastermind Michael Angelakos and Cashmere Cat produced. And then Jessie Ware and Hayley Williams and Tom Krell of How To Dress Well all tweeted it. The whole thing made Weaver ascendant overnight, and also yielded criticism from writers and readers alike, with people assuming Weaver was nothing more than an industry creation, or a rich kid with connections. (It’s kind of amazing how worked up people still get about the former in 2014.) Weaver herself took to the Stereogum comments section to set it a bit straight, and later spoke to Chris for an Artist To Watch feature, in which they talked about how, while the arrival of Ryn Weaver was sudden and definite, she’d been kicking around and working on material under her real name, Aryn Wuthrich, and briefly as FemFemFem first.

Early in the year, we saw reports that U2 were teaming up with producer Danger Mouse for a full album, one that was expected in April. They teamed up for the 2013 soundtrack song “Ordinary Love” and the free-giveaway single “Invisible.” And then the album never came out. When U2 did pull off their surprise release of Songs Of Innocence a few months later, Danger Mouse was in the credits a lot, but he was far from the sole producer, and those two previously released songs weren’t on the album. And based on what the band and their collaborators told Rolling Stone in a new profile, the band may have scrapped an entire Danger Mouse-produced album, one that sure seems like it was far along the way to completion.

CHVRCHES’ debut album, The Bones Of What You Believe, came out more than a year ago, but presumably due to their inclusion on the newly reimagined Drive soundtrack, as well as the new Hunger Games soundtrack, the Scottish electro-pop trio is once again promoting The Bones Of What You Believe via a new video. Unlike the majority of CHRVCHES songs, “Under The Tide” has Martin Doherty singing lead vocals. The visuals combine anime cartoons with a TRON-like geometric, computer-generated landscape. The video is also interspersed with flashing images of the band, in particular Martin who is singing, to produce a highly stimulating aesthetic that mirrors the boisterous synthesizers in the track. Watch.

Among the great jazz musicians who came to prominence in the ’60s, Herbie Hancock always seemed to be the most together. He easily adapted to fusion and funk and synthpop and Grammy-awarded singer-songwriter fare while his peers either died or got left behind. So it’s a little surprising to learn that Hancock spent a few years fighting a crack addiction. Today, Hancock has published a new memoir called Herbie Hancock: Possibilities. Part of the book deals with Hancock’s battle with the drug, a subject that I don’t think he’s ever discussed in detail before. Right now, Vulture has an excerpt about the first time Hancock tried crack. Here’s a quick taste: