Radiohead Will Record In September

NME reports that Radiohead will start work on the followup to 2011′s The King Of Limbs in the fall. While speaking to BBC Radio 6’s Mary Ann Hobbes, guitarist Jonny Greenwood said, “We’re going to start up in September, playing, rehearsing and recording and see how it’s sounding.” The band recently took a year off to focus on solo projects, including Thom Yorke’s Atoms For Peace and Greenwood’s own work scoring of Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice with the London Philharmonic.

Watch Radiohead play new song “Full Stop” in Auburn Hills, MI back in 2012:

[Photo by Mark Metcalfe/Getty.]

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Comments (62)
  1. This is awesome. But I loved KoL, so I fear I might be just a fanboy…

  2. This is indeed amazing news!

  3. Man, that’s right on schedule. An album every four years since 2003.

  4. sweet

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  6. guitarist Jonny Greenwood

  7. Nothing against King of Limbs but I hope they get back to the greatness of the previous six albums with this one. I mean KOL was a good album, but coming from the best band in the world who likes to take their sweet time between releases is was a bit of a let down.

  8. king of limbs is a great record, and when you consider that daily mail, staircase, butcher and supercollider were all written for the same record, it seems to grow in my mind to the status of their other material. i wish they would have waited and released the record with those 4 tracks.

    also ! for fun ! heres my rankings !
    1. kid a
    2. ok computer
    3. in rainbows
    4. the bends
    5. amnesiac
    6. king of limbs
    7. hail to the thief
    8. pablo honey

    also for what its worth have u heard killer cars ? a bside from the bends ! its like so good !

    • Was These Are My Twisted Words part of this too, or was it an In Rainbows leftover? That’s a gem.

      • yep unless i’m mistaken, these are my twisted words and harry patch were part of the king of limbs sessions, but we released way earlier

    • This is a great list, but I’d amend it just a bit:

      1) Kid A
      1) OK Computer
      1) In Rainbows
      1) The Bends
      1) Amnesiac
      1) King of Limbs
      1) Hail to the Thief
      8) Pablo Honey

      *I do believe I’ve made this joke before

      • All of you are underrated Hail To The Thief. I’d say its their 4th best, after Kid A, OK Computer, and IN Rainbows…
        Has some great tracks.

        • It does indeed, but I think its main shortcoming is that there are a few too many tracks on there! Even Thom has said as much. Most Radiohead albums have 10-12 tracks. KoL has a tad too few, and HttT has a few too many. I’m not a huge fan of Punch-Up at a Wedding even as a standalone track, but I tend to resent it for dragging the album out without fitting very well with the rest of the songs. And I quite like We Suck Young Blood and Backdrifts, but I’d prefer to have them as B-sides. The remaining 11 tracks are phenomenal, and they’d sound even better with some air to breathe.

          Plus, not everyone will agree, but I think the production on HttT was disappointing as well. Before this was recorded, the band was talking about capturing a live exciting, sexy sound in the studio. To me, it doesn’t sound live or sexy. That would be In Rainbows. The production of HttT as it is accentuates the nervousness and claustrophobia of Thom’s lyrics, but live the songs have so much more power.

          Despite this nitpicking, though, I still think it’s a fantastic album. In a slightly edited form, I’d put it over Amnesiac, but as it stands, I think the above lists look about right.

          • Am I only the one who doesn’t think Kid A is even close to being their best? I know this is heretical, but to me it goes: (1) OKC, (2) In Rainbows (3) Kid A.

            Frankly, I think Kid A gets a little too much credit because it’s an awesome electronic album by a rock band. But I think if you stack it up against other great electronic albums, even ones that significantly predate it, it just isn’t quite as groundbreaking as say, Aphex Twin’s Richard D. James album or Bjork’s Homogenic. And while it contains 4-5 indisputably classic Radiohead songs, there’s also some filler, some meandering noodly bits that foreshadow the murky, somewhat-missed-potential of Amensiac and Hail to the Thief. I think a lot of people agree that those are the weakest “peak-era” Radiohead albums, and if you listen critically to Kid A you’ll notice a lot of the problems have already set in. You can’t say shit about “Everything in its Right Place,” “National Anthem,” “How to Disappear Completely,” or “Idioteque” or “Motion Picture Soundtrack,” but the rest of the album is not nearly as strong. Again, I’d point to RDJ album or Homogenic as examples of albums that were every bit as pioneering (arguably more so since they are the albums that influenced Kid A) while being a bit more consistent overall.

            Anyway, the point of this is not to slag Radiohead or Kid A. It’s just interesting to me that Radiohead fans, who usually identify as “rock fans” rather than “electronic music fans” always say their “electronic” Kid A is the best, whereas I, as someone who listens to more electronic music than rock, think it’s a very good Radiohead album and a very good electronic music album, but not nearly the best in either category. Basically when I heard Kid A I thought, “oh cool, they made a Bjork album.” And I love that! But to me, “In Rainbows” has stronger songwriting AND a better blend of Radiohead’s classic guitar-slangin’ theatrics with some fine & uncharacteristically direct vocals from Thom Yorke. Overall, the songs don’t hit quite as hard or as much intensity as the highlights from “OKC” or “Kid A,” but there isn’t a bad song on there and the melodies have never been sharper.

            But “OKC” remains my favorite because c’mon every song except maybe “Electioneering” is a classic.

          • @dansolo

            I am not among your ranks, but you’re certainly not the only one.

            I tend not to think of Kid A as a “great electronic album,” but as a great Radiohead album, and maybe a “great art rock album.” Kind of in the vein of David Bowie’s Low.

            You could definitely tell that Thom et al. were listening to Aphex Twin and Autechre during this time, but I would of course select those artists for more interesting forays into electronic music. Still, I think the electronic touches on Kid A really helped to establish a mood of its own. For instance, the sampling of Yorke’s voice helped to take their songs into subtler emotional territory–what was once the focus in a very conventional rock band sense suddenly became just another instrument to add texture and melody. The title track could be thought of as a second rate Aphex Twin from the strict standards of sound pioneering, but the swatches of vocoder sputtering spliced up lyrics of doom just feels like a brilliant space to explore. It contributes to the album’s larger sense of fragmentation, of having come apart.

            I think of OK Computer as having kind of a dark comedy to it, like the film Brazil: it’s the raging against a system you know has totally consumed you. Kid A is like the last scene of the film, when terror eventually breaks him, and an uneasy serenity is all that’s left. So to me Kid A is less wannabe-Aphex and simply the perfect sequel to a perfect album.

          • dansolo, are you saying that “Optimistic” and “Morning Bell” are filler?

          • Filler? Not exactly. More like inessential, I guess.

            Put it this way: if I had a genie who was going to let me pick the setlist for my fantasy Radiohead concert, but the concert still had to be about normal-Radiohead-concert length, I’d cut those two tracks from the list before I’d touch a good 50% of In Rainbows and like 80% OKC, and it wouldn’t be a hard decision to make.

            But, hey superfans, “Kid A” is still my 3rd favorite album by one of my all-time favorite bands… so don’t wig out!

          • seen radiohead 11 times and a punch-up at a wedding is the only time I have left to pee during a song. still a great album though like amnesiac, but isn’t one of their 4 masterpieces

      • 1. Ok Computer
        2. In Rainbows
        3. Kid A
        4. The Bends
        5. Hail to the Theif
        6. King of Limbs
        7. Amnesiac
        8. Pablo Honey

      • Nailed it.

    • 1. kid a
      2. ok computer
      3. in rainbows
      4. amnesiac
      5. the bends
      6. hail to the thief
      7. king of limbs
      8. pablo honey

  9. Interesting question: will this include whatever they recorded at Third Man back in 2012? I’m still curious about what that was all about.

    • can’t see that making it onto a record tbh, but i’m surprised it hasn’t seen the light of day as a 12″ or something a la Staircase/Daily Mail

    • They recorded Identikit, which they played a bunch on their last tour. But it’s very much in the vein of KOL, so the recorded version might never actually see the light of day.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkEEGidt9GY

      • I hope the next album is based around Identikit, Full Stop, Cut a Hole and Skirting on the Surface, but knowing Radiohead they might start from scratch, which would be a shame, since I believe those 4 are a stellar batch of songs. Yes, they sound a bit like TKoL, but not overtly, they seem more organic and natural to me somehow.

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  11. A lot of the material on TKoL just felt way too sterile and stiff. The thing I love about Kid A-era material (besides, well, everything) is that they took a very cold and almost clinical approach to sound craft but injected it with so much human emotion. I actually think that this approach made the Kid A-era material sound much more emotive than their 90′s output. For whatever reason, it just doesn’t work on TKoL. Maybe because the songs are too repetitive, or maybe because they don’t sound as alien or unique. I don’t know. It’s a fine album, sure, but a subpar Radiohead album.

    Incidentally, the live versions of the TKoL songs sound way better than the album versions. Go figure.

    And coincidentally, I was at that show in Auburn Hills!

    • ga  |   Posted on Jul 14th 0

      I simply found KOL to be boring. They were expected to deliver ‘bloop bloop bleepy’ music and they did exactly that in spades. It felt predictable, although they did do it in a thoughtful way. I want to be surprised by them again, go punk rock or do acoustic folk or ambient metal or something ……

      • I stilldont understand why a lot of people keep saying TKOl is bleepy bloopy music. The only bleepy bloopy track was Bloom. Did a lot of people just stopped listening at Bloom? Everything else after that was very much guitar centric (well except for Codex). Heck they even went acoustic folk with Give Up The Ghost. So yeah, tell me people, wheere is this bleepy bloopy comments coming from?

        • It’s not bleepy bloopy per se, but the first half seems to be more inspired by electronic acts (Four Tet and Burial) than by rock/folk ones. There There was inspired by Banshees-era John McGeoch, and that was exciting. In Rainbow took things into a more minimal direction, and that was exciting. KoL is a bit different in that strong melodies are replaced a focus on strange time signatures, but it feels like a continuation of the minimalism of In Rainbows. Except that, as it is, the album is very stark and harsh with not much warmth. Amok goes for the electronic sound even more, but at least that was inviting and groovy. I actually was hoping for more of a classical feel to this one. The flugelhorns were a nice touch on Bloom (even better in the Basement version, because they’re more audible); I think some strings and other flourishes would have helped the songs a lot.

          Still great stuff, just not as enjoyable for me as other releases. Fairly close to Amnesiac in that respect.

  12. sd  |   Posted on Jul 13th +2

    Guys, they are just trying to throw everyone off. The new album will drop tomorrow!

  13. I’d like to hear Radiohead bring back their guitars for this one. Their guitar tones are one of their more interesting/unique attributes and I fear they’re getting away from that.

  14. I maybe am nervous about this. In Rainbows was a masterpiece, but many of those songs were older or reworked, so it was almost older than Hail to the Thief. I just don’t know where their process is with songs, and King of Limbs the songs just felt more like vibes than songs.

    1. OK Computer- sounds traditional next to Kid A
    1.5 Kid A
    2. In Rainbows
    2. The Bends- Sentimental favorite, but it is a different world and sound.
    5. Amnesiac
    6. Hail to the Thief
    7. King of Limbs
    8. Pablo Honey

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