obama_oath.jpg

Last night Arcade Fire played the Obama Staff Ball, the final official inaugural event and a celebration of the thousands of folks who campaigned tirelessly for the President. One year ago, Win Butler blogged, “Barack is the first candidate in my lifetime to strip some of the bullshit away.” In that spirit, last night’s setlist include a mandolin-led cover of Bruce Springsteen’s no bullshit “Born In The U.S.A.,” the anti-Vietnam anthem once clumsily co-opted by Ronald Reagan (CAMPAIGN SONG FAIL). It was a fitting goodbye to the Bush era, and a lot of fun to watch once the camera operator stops singing along.

Here’s “Intervention.”

Thanks Mariah for the heads up on the vids. And by the way folks, Win was born in Texas.

Comments (26)
  1. fox Confessor  |   Posted on Jan 22nd, 2009 0

    these are some talented fellows. i really love arcade fire.

  2. That’s a great cover… the instrumentation really makes it their own, though yeah, the cameraman’s backing vocals leave a lot to be desired. :P

  3. Dennis  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    LOL, nice Photoshop

  4. matthew  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    please point out that which has been photoshopped

  5. matthew  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    oooooo, neon bible, HA!

  6. joe  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    is that ra ra riot in the crowd?

  7. The guy singing in the crowd is a riot.

  8. Brian  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    It’s official — Arcade Fire are the truth

  9. toto  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    I really enjoyed watching Intervention, despite of seeing a pic of john travolta’s crotch in the ad to the left

  10. shmer  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    Kind of ironic considering the whole birth certificate debate and the fact that he quite possible was not “born in the USA”

  11. Daniel  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    Does his guitar say, “Take Video For Kaye?”

    • candicethelost  |   Posted on Jan 27th, 2009 0

      On this guitar, “sak vide pa kanpe” was written in duct tape across the front. A Haitian proverb meaning “An empty sack cannot stand up” in Creole, this was a reference to the extreme poverty of Haiti, the country of origin of RĂ©gine Chassagne.

      *http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arcade_fire

  12. Wes  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    Nothing like an expatriate and his band singing a protest song about a country he loved so much, he left it. But hey, it’s always good to come back to something you hate so much and talk shit, because you know that plane is waiting to take you back to your country” I dunno, just seems like real americans singing songs of protest have a greater meaning

    • Win Butler is a REAL American; he was born in Texas and spent all of his adolescent years in the states. He moved to Montreal in search of higher education and love kept him there. He’s not “talking shit” and has as much right to voice his opinion about American politics as you, me or anyone else.

  13. John  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    Wasn’t Win born in Canada?

  14. Casey  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    I was there. I wasn’t aware Arcade Fire would be there, and was incredibly surprised and subsequently blown away

  15. Lovin' it .  |   Posted on Jan 23rd, 2009 0

    Wow, should we all be thanking the cameraman for 3:48 on or what ?!

  16. whisper  |   Posted on Jan 24th, 2009 0

    looks like haitian creole. ‘an empty sack can’t stand’. ??

  17. I can only imagine how boring the musicians would be for the balls if McCaine were elected.

  18. gaby  |   Posted on Jan 24th, 2009 0

    LOL neon bible!

  19. raylokicks  |   Posted on Feb 4th, 2009 0

    arcade fire is really a fantastic band, but seriously if anyone needs to strip away the bullshi*, it’s win. why do musicians think their opinion in politics belongs up on the stage? honestly, how many people live or think like famous musicians?

    republican or democrat, your music is what people want to hear – unless of course mindless obama adulation is your jam.

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