Lana Del Rey Fader cover

Lana Del Rey’s first (and, thus far, only) interview of the Ultraviolence press cycle is a Fader cover story that emerged today. The story contained some revealing content about Del Rey’s past as well as some sure-to-be controversial opinions. One subject that came up was feminism, which Del Rey more or less rejects. Here’s what she had to say in regard to criticism of the submissive posture she often adopts in songs:

For me, the issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept. I’m more interested in, you know, SpaceX and Tesla, what’s going to happen with our intergalactic possibilities. Whenever people bring up feminism, I’m like, god. I’m just not really that interested… My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants.

She mentioned a long-running relationship with a record exec, though she didn’t say whether he was the inspiration for the Ultraviolence track “Fucked My Way Up To The Top”:

I had a seven-year relationship with the head of this label, and he was a huge inspiration to me. I’ll tell you later when more people know. He never signed me, but he was like my muse, the love of my life.

She also discussed her emotional reaction to fan support in Dublin last year:

I’d been sick on tour for about two years with this medical anomaly that doctors couldn’t figure out. That’s a big part of my life: I just feel really sick a lot of the time and can’t figure out why. I’d gotten these shots in Russia, where we’d just been. It was just heavy. It’s just heavy performing for people who really care about you, and you don’t really care that much about yourself sometimes. I thought it was sad. I thought my position was sad. I thought it was sad to be in Ireland singing for people who really cared when I wasn’t sure if I did.

Read the full interview at Fader.

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Comments (75)
  1. Does Lana del Rey have room in her head for only a few current events? Does she yell “BORING TALK ABOUT SPACE” when people bring up feminism?

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      • Of course we understood her point. She’s bored with feminism because she has no fucking appreciation for the fact that she wouldn’t feel free to do whatever she likes, or in fact be free to do whatever she likes, if it weren’t for the history of feminism in her culture and society. What an ungrateful cretin. And what total insensitivity to the plight of women who don’t have the freedoms she does, simply because they are women.

        • What “we” are you speaking for now? Who gave you the power to interpret the meaning behind the statement of a human being you know nothing about? She said absolutely nothing that you just rambled on about, and you have fuck all of an idea if that’s what she really meant. But that’s what fits your angry feminist agenda, so go on ahead and hate.

          • if she doesn’t appreciate the struggle she’s not going to critically think about it. If feminism is boring to her she probably doesn’t appreciate that struggle.

            I wouldn’t call her cretin, but who gave YOU the power to say she DOES have appreciation for the struggle behind feminism.

        • Rihanna has said and acted so MUCH worse but she gets so much feminist love. Why the Lana bashing? I may disagree with her but at least she is honest and doesn’t shove her vagina in my face EVERYDAY, whilst bullying young dark skinned girls on the internet.

  2. Lana Del Rey; ”My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants”. Amen

    • Cerebus  |   Posted on Jun 5th -11

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      • I have a feeling that you haven’t had any exposure to feminists or feminist theory outside of the internet. In general, feminism isn’t about blaming men for oppressive gender roles. Men are indoctrinated into gender roles just like women are. It just so happens that male gender roles tend to be more overwhelmingly advantageous. To reduce a well complex and well established movement to such trite observations as “feminists hate men” is rather lazy and myopic on your part.

        To clarify – I have no problem with Lana Del Rey not giving a fuck about feminism. What does irk me is that she seems to have lazily misconstrued feminism as something as reductive as “men suck women r00l”. And to play it off like she can’t even be bothered to learn about and understand feminism because she spends all day contemplating our “intergalactic possibilities” seems rather pretentious.

        • // It just so happens that male gender roles tend to be more overwhelmingly advantageous.//
          Overwhelmingly advantageous? No. A little bit more advantageous? That’s even debatable. If you look at many of the social factors that we use to measure well-being, we find that men are disadvantaged in many areas: workplace mortality, homelessness, drug addiction, suicide, dying or becoming injured or traumatized in wars. Men are victims of rape more often than women, due to the US’s grotesque prison system.

          Most feminists have done a poor job of recognizing the role that women play in helping to perpetuate the cycle of violence in society. Mothers frequently hit their male children, and children who are hit are far more likely to grow up and use violence as adults. If women want to reduce hatred and violence against women, a great place to start would be for mothers to stop inflicting violence onto their sons. This is a huge blindspot in the feminist narrative. It doesn’t fit into the narrative of a monolithic patriarchal force oppressing women, so most of them ignore it.

          The so-called “gender pay gap” narrative is very misleading too. Women, of their own free will, *CHOOSE* to go into fields like social work that pay less but provide other perks. The benefits of job satisfaction offset the forgone extra income that they could be earning in another field that pays more but where the work is less pleasant. After you adjust for the different career choices that men and women make, and compare women and men with similar education and job experience working in the same field, the “gender pay gap” all but disappears (!).

          The so-called gap that feminists complain about is calculated by taking an aggregate of all males in every field and all women in every field and averaging them out. But those numbers mean very little if they are extracted from the context of human choices. Income is not the only factor that drives career choices, and it should not be treated as such by feminists. If women want to start going into higher paying fields like engineering, they are perfectly free to do so, but maybe they don’t want to, and that’s OK.

          • Let me unpack this -

            “Overwhelmingly advantageous? No. A little bit more advantageous? That’s even debatable.”

            Alright, lets do this…

            1) “If you look at many of the social factors that we use to measure well-being, we find that men are disadvantaged in many areas: workplace mortality, homelessness, drug addiction, suicide, dying or becoming injured or traumatized in wars.”

            Masculine gender roles would have it so that men are indoctrinated into dangerous fields of work. You could argue that this has its roots in the infantilization of women – “this is a MAN’S job and WE have to take on the burden for YOU because YOU are too fragile to do it yourselves.”

            Is this a luxury for women? Is it a luxury to be raised as homemakers and mothers, unable to participate fully in sharing the burden of society’s most difficult work? All of this under the assumption that men are OBLIGATED to do these kinds of jobs because women CAN’T. Allowing women to engage in more masculine roles would probably do a lot of good for both men and women, and this begins at deconstructing (eck…that word) gender roles.

            2) “Men are victims of rape more often than women, due to the US’s grotesque prison system.”

            1 in 6 US women have been the victim of an attempted or completed rape. 1 in 33 men have been the victim of an attempted or completed rape. (source – https://rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-victims)

            This is a horrifying statistic. Its actually very likely that at least some of the women that you know and are close to or interact with on an everyday basis have been sexually abused.

            Of course this is not accounting for the fact that rape is one of he most under reported crimes (I think the average is something like 60% of all rapes go unreported – so more than half). Mind you – not just under reported for women, but also, for men. I’d be willing to accept the notion that men are even less likely than women to report being raped. Its a blow to this entirely contrived notion of masculinity to admit to being raped. This is a serious issue and its absurd to assume that feminist aren’t concerned with the rape of men.

            But again, these disadvantageous that men face somehow seem to work both ways at being a disadvantage for women. This stigma of shame/guilt attached to rape only reinforces the idea that only someone who is weak, someone who is a victim, would admit to being raped. Again – women are weak. Women are victims. It makes sense that they’re rape victims and that they should report it. It doesn’t make sense that men are rape victims.

            Follow the genealogy of this idea back to ancient Rome – for members of the Roman army, it was a crime to allow yourself to be raped without killing the other person. The punishment for this was death. The idea was that it was shameful and un-masculine for men to be penetrated – you would rather die than to allow yourself to be violated.

            This notion of masculinity applies to the other issues you brought up – homelessness, drug addiction, etc. Its harder for men to admit to being weak and so it makes sense that some men would rather be homeless than dependent on somebody else. It would make sense that more men would rather turn to drugs to deal with their issues rather than make themselves vulnerable by admitting that they are experiencing emotional turmoil.

            All of these things, while they are horrible and are serious problems, also lends a great deal of power to men. Even men’s disadvantageous are in some ways advantageous.

            3) “Most feminists have done a poor job of recognizing the role that women play in helping to perpetuate the cycle of violence in society. Mothers frequently hit their male children, and children who are hit are far more likely to grow up and use violence as adults. If women want to reduce hatred and violence against women, a great place to start would be for mothers to stop inflicting violence onto their sons.”

            Ultimately it seems like you’re trying to pull a red herring here. This is ultimately a horribly irrelevant argument. I could easily turn the argument around and say “fathers walk out on their families more so than mothers. This results in frustrated and struggling single mothers who in turn take out their frustrations on their children. Therefore, men are responsible for violent adults.”

            I’m not about to go into a discussion on causality. But I can tell you that while both of these assumptions are probably true (abusive mothers and fathers result in violent adults) it would be stupid to reduce the actions of violent adults to just ONE source. To be honest, I can’t even believe I bothered typing a response to this point, because its such a lame argument.

            4) The so-called “gender pay gap” narrative is very misleading too. Women, of their own free will, *CHOOSE* to go into fields like social work that pay less but provide other perks.

            Okay, again, let me preface this – I’m not going to get into a debate on freedom vs. ontological determinism. All I’m going to say about it is yes, we do have free-will. But also, we are subjects to forces that are beyond out control. If from day one on this planet you’re absorbing the cultural signals that say “women should be homemakers and caretakers”, there’s a good chance that this will have a significant impact on what career choices you make down the line.

            There’s a second layer to the issue here. Only in a society informed by the western philosophical tradition (stemming from the Platonic notions of rationality, objectivity, dialectic reasoning, etc.) and capitalist ideals/morals (utility trumping any notion of inherent self-worth) would we pay so little to jobs that are so important. Fuck social work. Fuck the well being of people. Lets build some more fucking cares. And of course it is men who are granted the privilege to participate in this more “esteemed”, rational realm. Women’s work is base – it is about the body, about the home, about animal need to cultivate life. Men have more transcendental things to worry about. Things that are more important than mere people.

            Again, all you have to do is look at the genealogy. The writings of Plato (who informed the entire western philosophical tradition) is overwhelmingly misogynistic. It places women and children in its own sphere along with the animal – the base level. There is a clear distinction between men and women and there is clearly more favor given to men. These kinds of ideas form the basis of many of our assumptions about the world and how it works. It took up until he 20th century for philosophers to look backwards to the ancients and start questioning their assumptions.

            This argument, like the last one, is incredibly shallow. If the African American community wants to make societal progress they just need to stop CHOOSING to get involved in gang violence. They need to stop CHOOSING to live in ghettos and gentrified neighborhoods. They need to stop CHOOSING to live around drug addicts. They need to stop CHOOSING to enroll their children in broken public school systems.

            (I hope the sarcasm was obvious)

            4 cont…) “If women want to start going into higher paying fields like engineering, they are perfectly free to do so, but maybe they don’t want to, and that’s OK.”

            How does this make any sense? You propose the idea that “maybe women don’t want to go into higher paying fields” without even question “why is this?” Are you suggesting that there is some sort of biological basis that makes women not want to participate in dangerous/strenuous labor or participate in the realm of professionals? Why would this be the case? Why wouldn’t women want to empower themselves by making more money and becoming more educated?

            I find that nearly every MRA argument begins by pulling some fucking rhetorical or ethical gymnastic trick that has its roots in some gross generalizations or anecdotal evidence. And even the valid arguments that actually do deserve careful consideration are often weaponized AGAINST feminists and used as a reason to support misogyny. As if the assumption that all feminists are men-hating bra burners isn’t completely false. Actual feminists recognize that men (like women) are victims of socially defined gender roles and that by addressing the issues that men face (e.g. the pressure to be masculine, independent, rational, unemotional, etc) would better the lives of both men AND women. It would be counterproductive for feminists not to address how gender roles affect both men and women.

            And when you talk about the feminist narrative, I can’t help but just assume that you’re referring to internet feminism. Again, I suggest that anybody who wants to understand feminism goes out and reads some books and talk to actual feminist theorists, professors, and intellectuals.

            Tumblr feminism is just as red-pilled and kneejerky as the MRA movement at time. Typically I just try to steer clear of the kind of toxic discourse spewing from the internet. Because who knows if I’m being lectured by someone who is actually a rigorous intellectual or some angry teenager with too much free time.

          • @ sloppymilkshake

            // Masculine gender roles would have it so that men are indoctrinated into dangerous fields of work. You could argue that this has its roots in the infantilization of women – “this is a MAN’S job and WE have to take on the burden for YOU because YOU are too fragile to do it yourselves.” Is this a luxury for women? Is it a luxury to be raised as homemakers and mothers, unable to participate fully in sharing the burden of society’s most difficult work?//

            What do you consider to be society’s most difficult work? Handling the majority of homemaker responsibilities while raising children is a very difficult job, any mother will tell you.

            //All of this under the assumption that men are OBLIGATED to do these kinds of jobs because women CAN’T.//

            Again, what specific jobs are we talking about? Most women, and most men even, do not want to haul bags of cement all day. Surely many women _can_ do such a job, but they don’t want to. I’m glad that men are hauling the majority of cement in the world. In general the male physique is better suited for such work.

            As you know, generally men have higher levels of androgenic hormones like testosterone. I’m sorry, but the different hormonal makeup of men and women predisposes them to certain inclinations in life. There’s no getting around that. We’re *not* saying that all of the typical male and female roles that we see today and have seen traditionally are based 100% on biological factors; we’re only saying that biology plays a part. I think most feminists would agree with this, but they tend to downplay its importance.

            //Its a blow to this entirely contrived notion of masculinity to admit to being raped. This is a serious issue and its absurd to assume that feminist aren’t concerned with the rape of men… Again – women are weak. Women are victims. It makes sense that they’re rape victims and that they should report it. It doesn’t make sense that men are rape victims.//

            Every man would hope that he if he were ever to find himself in a situation where someone was attempting to rape him, that he would be able to fight off the attack rather than succumb to it. The necessity to defend oneself from predators is a deep-seated and intrinsically useful male instinct. There is nothing “contrived” about this instinct. If a man is unable to defend himself from an attack, that is going to be a blow to his sense of manhood, so it’s no wonder that men don’t want to talk about the experience afterwards. We can acknowledge this reality while at the same time encouraging men not to be afraid to talk about what happened to them. I’m certainly in agreement with you that people should not heap shame on a male rape victim.

            //All of these things, while they are horrible and are serious problems, also lends a great deal of power to men. Even men’s disadvantageous are in some ways advantageous.//

            Wait…how are men gaining power through these disadvantages? How is being homeless advantageous?

            //I’m not about to go into a discussion on causality. But I can tell you that while both of these assumptions are probably true (abusive mothers and fathers result in violent adults) it would be stupid to reduce the actions of violent adults to just ONE source. To be honest, I can’t even believe I bothered typing a response to this point, because its such a lame argument.//

            If you look at what I wrote, I never suggested that this ONE source is exclusively 100% responsible. I agree with you that it’s complicated, that there is a confluence of factors and feedback loops that all figure into the causation. I am simply bringing factors to the table which are often overlooked. If feminists perceive women as being victims of an imposed patriarchy, then they are more likely to overlook the responsibility that women are playing in helping to perpetuate the cycle of violence, and what part women can play (along with men) in ending the cycle.

            //But also, we are subjects to forces that are beyond out control. If from day one on this planet you’re absorbing the cultural signals that say “women should be homemakers and caretakers”, there’s a good chance that this will have a significant impact on what career choices you make down the line.//

            We’re in agreement again. Of course women and men are receiving cultural signals all the time. Established cultural norms tend to reinforce themselves because of the fact that they are widespread and typical, so that’s what people see the most of. But so what?! This brings us back to my point about choice. The only way for a woman to break out of an expected female role that doesn’t suit her is for her to, first, make a choice to break out, and second, have the will to carry it out. I don’t know what else you want me to do other than encourage women to choose whichever path looks most appealing to them.

            // This argument, like the last one, is incredibly shallow. If the African American community wants to make societal progress they just need to stop CHOOSING to get involved in gang violence. They need to stop CHOOSING to live in ghettos and gentrified neighborhoods. They need to stop CHOOSING to live around drug addicts. They need to stop CHOOSING to enroll their children in broken public school systems.//

            How to bring more prosperity to the black community? That’s another discussion for another day, but I’d be willing to bet you that the choices of black people will play no small part in it. Does the story start and end there? Of course not.

            // How does this make any sense? You propose the idea that “maybe women don’t want to go into higher paying fields” without even question “why is this?” Are you suggesting that there is some sort of biological basis that makes women not want to participate in dangerous/strenuous labor or participate in the realm of professionals?

            I think women’s choices are based on a combination of biological and culture and other factors. Are you dismissing the idea that biology is part of it?

            //Why would this be the case? Why wouldn’t women want to empower themselves by making more money and becoming more educated?//

            Women are very well educated these days. There are more women graduating from college than men. As for earning more money, this brings me back to my point that income is not necessarily the most important motivator when someone is choosing a line of work. Many people are willing to forego extra income if it means that their day-to-day enjoyment of the job is greater than it would be in some other higher-paying job. Many women indeed do choose to go into higher paying fields, and good for them if that’s what they want! I don’t think we should *assume* that the ratio of women going into these fields is below the socially optimal ratio—maybe it is, and maybe it isn’t.

            What pisses me off about all the “wage gap” hullabaloo is that it makes a lot of women feel bad about their contribution to society. It makes them feel inferior and undervalued. There’s no reason for women to take it for granted that it’s incumbent upon them to attain the same average aggregate wage as men. If the gap naturally evens out over time as the result of women following their individual desires, then great. On the other hand, we could hypothetically have a scenario in which every woman is self actualizing and experiencing the best life possible, and there might *still* be an average aggregate wage gap, based on different preferential tendencies between men and women.

            // Actual feminists recognize that men (like women) are victims of socially defined gender roles and that by addressing the issues that men face (e.g. the pressure to be masculine, independent, rational, unemotional, etc) would better the lives of both men AND women. It would be counterproductive for feminists not to address how gender roles affect both men and women.//

            It’s true that every human being on the planet exists within a particular cultural paradigm which will inevitably expose him/her to certain social expectations and pressures. These expectations and pressures are not always ones that produce socially optimal outcomes, but they do exist for a reason, because enough people within the culture were convinced that they were useful and desirable. They’re not always completely arbitrary and backwards, so we need to be careful not to dismiss them out of hand without understanding what factors led to their emergence. And just because a majority of (wo)men conform to a particular gender role does not mean that those who step outside of the role should be looked down upon or discouraged from pursuing their desires. I think what we need here is a balance between accepting that certain norms might be useful, and might have a significant basis in biology, while at the same time being flexible and decent enough to respect people who choose not to conform.

  3. “For me, the issue of feminism is just not an interesting concept. I’m more interested in, you know, SpaceX and Tesla, what’s going to happen with our intergalactic possibilities. Whenever people bring up feminism, I’m like, god. I’m just not really that interested… My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants.”

    Yeah, there’s a big difference between feeling free enough to do what you want and actually having the real possibility of being free enough to do what you want. I think I understand what she’s trying to say. She should have worded it like “as a woman I should be free enough to choose to take a submissive posture in my music.” But don’t dismiss feminism because believe it or not, it got her to where she is today versus 100 years ago.

    • As a woman, isn’t she in a pretty solid position to say that feminism doesn’t really interest her?

      Don’t get me wrong, I agree with the basis of your point, but I don’t think there’s anything with ladies not getting worked up over gender issues.

      • anything wrong with*

      • I think if she doesn’t want to get “worked up” then that’s her prerogative, but it comes across as unreflective and ungrateful for a woman who benefits from the work done by previous generations (and current generations!) of feminists to just be like “SNOOZE” when the issue comes up.

        • Cerebus  |   Posted on Jun 5th -14

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          • Aren’t you like a 40 year old man?

          • That’s highly debatable. We’re HUMAN BEINGS, as you said, not omniscient, autonomous gods. You are exposed to the things you are exposed to, and you have no knowledge of the things you are not exposed to. You are indoctrinated into certain beliefs, worldviews, habits and roles by your family and your society and they can be very hard to break out of–and if you are never exposed to opposing viewpoints or situations that make you question your own, you simply don’t break out of them. You are the product of previous generations. You are only aware of concepts like logic and deductive reasoning because you were made aware of them through people and events outside of yourself. By the time you had the capacity to make considered decisions, everything about who you were had already been determined by forces outside of yourself–genetics, environment, interactions with others, events beyond your control. As an individual human being, you do not contain all possibilities from which you can create any reality out of a vacuum. You exist in a specific point in time, space, and history. You cannot use free will as an argument as though it were a given. The concept of free will rejects both cause/effect and randomness in favor of some undefined middle ground. The argument that we are reactions to events before us–like everything else in this universe–and that free will is ultimately an illusion is a far more compelling one.

    • Pop singers already get songs written for them. You take it a step further by trying to write their opinions. OWWWOOOOOOOOO!

    • No. I disagree with you 100%. You’re dictating to her how you believe she should act and what she should say. That is not freedom, that’s oppression. She exhibited more true feminism by standing up and publicly stating she finds what the masses consider to BE feminism than she could of by making a thousand of the same boring statements that everyone else makes. She said what SHE wanted to say.

      • No one is telling Lana what she has to think/feel/say. Her right to free expression has not only been respected, she has been given a major media platform to amplify her message. It’s totally fine for people who see things differently to use this, admittedly smaller, media platform to express disappointment or disagreement.

  4. That is the best argument against feminism I’ve ever heard. I mean what if we get to a planet and they don’t even have men and women? What if they have three sexes? What if the women are oppressing the men? What then? INTERGALACTIC POSSIBILITIES, PEOPLE!!!! OPEN YOUR MINDS

  5. Lana del Rey, a person totally disconnected from reality who has no clue of the abuses, preconceptions and limits that a common woman faces every day in the several kinds of sexist societies around the world.

    • Cerebus  |   Posted on Jun 5th -10

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  6. “My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants.”
    soooo is every feminist’s

    • Cerebus  |   Posted on Jun 5th -21

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  7. Stop trying to look for something that isn’t there. It’s her opinion and therefore she can say whatever the fuck she wants. She doesn’t have to be overtly pro-feminism if she doesn’t really care about it.

  8. i think people misunderstood that concept lana said….i guess everyone talks about their own reality when it comes of facing problems, she said that they should do whatever they want…obvioulsy in their own posibilities…bc some might say “mmm she grew up in a wealthy family and had no problems as many others” but hey, that does not take your right to try to do whatever you want if its against the social issues you are facing.

  9. I’m kind of surprised at the amount of high-profile lady celebrities dismissing feminism in interviews recently. LDR, Katy Perry, Shailene Woodley, and Taylor Swift have all kind of brushed it off. You’d think that some of the biggest names in entertainment would be behind (or at least pretend to be behind) a hot-button issue, for publicity’s sake.

    • Shailene Woodley is behind eating clay tho

    • Cerebus  |   Posted on Jun 5th -11

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    • Honestly, I think it’s an easy way for a female artist to be “provocative” while actually just picking on an easy target. I don’t know how it is in the rest of the world, but feminism is a bad word to most Americans. Most people’s sense of what it means is predicated less on an understanding of what feminism is now and historically has been then on a bunch of tired but still somehow ubiquitous jokes about “feminazis” and “bra-burners” and “man-haters.” I also think there is some pressure to present oneself as a “cool girl” who will laugh along with the bros and their sexism, their rape jokes, whatever else. Throwing feminism under the bus is just a lazy PR move.

      And while I will admit I do not have the slightest idea who Shailene Woodley is, I think it’s kind of unsurprising about the other three because LDR, Katy Perry, and Taylor Swift all present their gender in very regressive ways. I’d cut T-Swift some slack because she’s younger, but LDR and Katy Perry are both in full-on pin-up bimbo mode.

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    • rskva  |   Posted on Jun 5th +6

      Let’s examine for a second the backgrounds of these different people. Swift was born into a conservative area of PA and into a very religious family, Katy Perry was born to Pentecostal pastors (both having converted after “wild youths”), LDR also came from a deeply religious family — so those three specifically came from conservative Christian backgrounds. Even if Perry has gone out of her way to reject that background by playing up her sexuality, and even to an extent the same with LDR, it still informs at least a part of their worldviews. Swift has never rejected that background, instead embracing it to woo those audiences. It’s not much of a surprise, then, that three women raised in conservative Christian families would end up rejecting the tenets of feminism, ideas they were probably raised to believe were opposed to their own.

      Woodley’s the only outlier of that group that would be harder to explain.

      • rsvka I think that’s spot on.

        In some way I find Katy Perry the most disturbing of all because she presents herself, at the most superficial level possible, as a “liberated” woman who is “in control of her sexuality” and “no longer needs feminism,” while also affirming a ton of that deeply sexist bullshit that came with her upbringing.

        And yeah the climate in country music is certainly not friendly to feminism. Even Miranda Lambert, who is sort of a huge badass, doesn’t like to use the “F-word.”

    • Really though, if you are a grown adult and LDR, Katy Perry, Shailene Woodley, and Taylor Swift are your sources for insight into complex social issues, you have much bigger problems than whether or not you dismiss feminism.

  10. What people seem to be missing is that “Lana Del Rey” is a contrived persona, as all pop stars (but especially her) are in some respect. Of course she’s going to say edgy and controversial and tragic sounding things before her album drops. Dan Auerbach, who produced Ultraviolence, described her as looking at her music like an art project. I don’t see why this should be any different.

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  12. “I’m more interested in, you know, SpaceX and Tesla, what’s going to happen with our intergalactic possibilities.”

    You mean conversations you would have been excluded from even just 40 years ago, Lana, because you are a woman?

    “My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants.”

    No, dear, that’s not a what a feminist is; that’s what feminism enables. The women who feel that way, feel so because feminists before her spoke up on her behalf.

    How totally fucking ungrateful she is. It would all be a bit more ‘interesting’ I’m sure, if she didn’t have the rights she does. And it should be more interesting to her simply because there are so many women in the world who still don’t.

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      • adddo  |   Posted on Jun 5th +5

        What exactly did Debbie say that you take exception to? That women once were excluded from certain professions on the basis of gender? That equal rights enables women to feel free? Or that LDR should be grateful for the civic engagement of feminists who came before her? That really seems aggressive and irrational to you?

      • 1. “a magnitude of other people” – that doesn’t even mean anything
        2. how appropriate that a young woman who dislikes feminism would represent herself with a picture in which she is blinded by what appears to be a pink undergarment. tell me, are you a performance artist of some sort?

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        • Thought you should know some of read through the lines and know what you are trying to say. Because women have gotten such a raw deal for such a long time it seems as if ANY critique of feminism is met with sheer horror. Every group on Earth that bands together will always have extremists that make the thoughtful and important voices shudder.

  13. Regardless of whether or not you think her comments about feminism are dumb, isn’t it a little disconcerting that this is even a conversation? Feminism, at its core, has the goal of equality for all. Her feeling compelled to say something against it is disappointing, but I think this is a tip of the iceberg situation. What prompted her to feel that way? You cannot deny that there is an extremely vocal group on the internet that gives feminism a bad name. I can barely go on Facebook or Twitter without encountering some self righteous idiot lecturing everyone else on how they should feel about the issue. Shit, it’s right here in this comment section. That kind of stuff cannibalizes the movement and then you have people who are very much in the limelight dismissing it entirely because they don’t want to be associated with that asshole from your high school who posts shit from Jezebel and Tumblr 5 times a day on your Facebook feed, then that asshole gets angry and overly critical on your Facebook feed about those dismissive comments, and the cycle continues.

    TL;DR

    • I don’t really disagree with you, but I think you’re doing a pretty bad job of keeping this in perspective.

      Women face routine sexual harassment and the threat thereof; women have to listen to men (and other women) make dumb, misogynistic jokes and are expected to put up with it quietly or even laugh along; women face constant needling about their body image, complexion, weight, hair, etc., from advertisers trying to capitalize on their insecurities; women are constantly being reminded by advice columnists and op-ed writers that “their biological clocks are ticking,” constantly being reminded that they need to balance career and family (the equivalent columns for men being mostly about how to get ahead in your carer, no mention of family), and so forth. This all shit I see on a regular basis not just on the internet, but even on the liberal/PC cocoon that is my Facebook feed.

      In that context, acting like the big problem is “annoying feminists” rather than “pervasive sexism” is kind of fucked up.

    • I don’t think a grown woman who has a job should be spending her time on the internet or listening to what the Rihanna obsessed hypocrites on Jezebel have to say!!? Surely Lana should be taking her knowledge from books….

      I’m on here but dude, I’m not gonna take anyone speaking irrational childish hypocritical rubbish seriously! Didn’t waste KKKKK’s on my degree to get worked up by some anon poster on Jezebel or Tumblr or Stereogum!

  14. Was going to say something about LDR but the lady in the cube next to me has an alarm ringing at MAX VOLUME!!!! FML!!!!!! WHERE IS SHE???

  15. I really don’t like the attitude in this comment section that women just need to ‘chill’ and that feminism is a null issue now (it isn’t).

    Woman aren’t trying to ‘take over’, that doesn’t even make sense, by implying that you think they want to take over just shows how you already view yourself in a hierarchy with them where you’re superior, which is part of the problem.. you shouldn’t view yourself as in competition with a whole sex.

    Also just because woman are voicing their opinions doesn’t make them bitches, look at what they’re saying (most of the comments in this section make complete sense) and don’t just get defensive straight away.

  16. Elizabeth Grant, the living embodiment of girls donning glasses to be ‘nerds’ when they grow tired of being prom queen.

  17. LOL LOL LOL!!! I MEAN… lol.

  18. Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see

    • “Bunch stereotypical, knee jerk, angry, finger pointing feminists up in here”

      Says the stereotypical MRA with a misguided and knee-jerky understanding of feminism who is angry enough at everyone else for down voting his 10+ comments that he feels the need to point the finger and accuse them of being “stereotypical, knee jerk, angry, finger pointing feminists.”

      And the whole “the world is hard so deal with it” argument is so fucking trite. Yes, the world is unfair. Some people are born short and others are born tall. Some babies are born normal and some are born literally inside-out. There’s not much we can do about this. What we DO have the power to control (or at least change) are the arbitrary inequalities caused and propagated (first and foremost) by us.

  19. I feel like she doesn’t know what feminism is, or else she wouldn’t find it boring or passe

  20. Why is Cerebus getting downvote annihilated in here?

    • Well, I’d humbly submit that it has to do with the substance of his posts, which seem to revolve around
      (a) sycophantic defensiveness of Lana Del Rey; (b) stereotyping feminism; (c) going on long-winded, frequently incoherent rants.

      That being said, the fact the he has gone through and started an argument with *every single person* who has expressed a different POV may be part of the issue as well. When a thread has a grand total of 50 comments, 20 of them should not be from the same user.

  21. “My idea of a true feminist is a woman who feels free enough to do whatever she wants.”
    Agreed. And if Lana isn’t particularly interested in feminism, that’s okay. However, a little acknowledgement that feminism is the cultural force that has allowed women like herself to do whatever they want would be nice. Many women (and men) throughout history have had to fight hard for the rights that Lana, myself, and other women take for granted today. It’s also important to note that there are still places in the world where women cannot do whatever they want, and feminism is still very necessary. Once again, it doesn’t have to be her thing and I’m not criticizing her, I just want people to be aware of what feminism really is and why it’s not just something trivial or annoying.

  22. when is iggy azalea going to get the manufactured backlash?

    • People expect it from her. Lana, we all thought there was something….there? Like we could be friends with this girl at art school or on a social level but that is people projecting on Lana.

      Moi? Meh. Do people not LISTEN to her lyrics or watch her videos?? She’s really kinda dumb. And obsessed with this idea of femininity that reminds me of my old housemate who was super intelligent but tried to look/dress/behave like Marilyn Monroe. Deeply superficial, obsessive and very damaged.

  23. This is what happens when you give them shoes.

  24. when is the comments section going to get a sort feature for ascending/descending number of votes?

  25. I think all of you are missing the obvious big picture here….

    She’s really, really hot.

  26. Why do you guys care what this moron thinks about feminism?

  27. Has anybody actually read the entire article, or just the few sentences posted up there? I guess I didn’t realize Lana was supposed to be the spokesperson on feminism just because she’s a woman. Me personally, I just like the music. I don’t usually care about political/social views… unless they’re neo-nazis or something. I usually just assume celebrities are going to be pampered little shits who’s opinions I don’t care for. It’s not like most of them got to where they are by being themselves!

  28. being uninterested in something doesnt equate to being against it

    im not interested in flan or sports or touching boobs but i am not against them

    everything intelligent that can be said about feminism has already been said. lana isnt surrounded by scholars that could actually have something interesting or new to add to the conversation. she probably, like most of us, has friends of average intelligence. the other day my friends were sitting around talking about my our friend who just died. it was a bunch of cliches. it was hella boring.

    space offers limitless possibilites beyond imagination…how can an old ass concept (which im all for) compete for one’s attention?

    once again, not being interested doesn’t equate to “against.”

    • Scholars? Dude when did you learn about feminism? We had to when I was 11/12. We studied Marie Curie. Emily Pankhurst. HOW COULD YOU NOT?!!

      But thanks for reducing women’s rights that still greatly impact the poorer class and women in third world countries to “flan, sports or touching boobs”.

      WOW. WOW. WOW.

      F*ck.

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